List of the geographical objects named by the German Antarctic Expedition 1938/39 - Liste der von der Deutschen Antarktischen Expedition 1938/39 benannten geographischen Objekte

The list gives the names and positions of 87 geographical objects in Queen Maud Land in East Antarctica , which were discovered in January and February 1939 by the German Antarctic Expedition 1938/39 during photogrammetric flights . The names were first recorded in 1942 on the maps attached to Alfred Ritscher's expedition report. On August 5, 1952, the assignment of the names was confirmed by the Foreign Office in Federal Gazette No. 149.

The exact position of objects in italics could not be determined so far, because the position in the expedition report was too imprecise due to navigation problems of the aircraft and most of the aerial images that would allow identification were lost in the Second World War . The names of objects that could be clearly localized were used in the Norwegian translation on the topographic map Dronning Maud Land 1: 250,000 published by the Norsk Polarinstitutt from 1966 .

Listing

Name[1] Name on the Norwegian map Position (information in the Federal Gazette) Position (corrected center point coordinates) Name after / note
Alexander von Humboldt Mountains Humboldtfjella 71° 24′–72° S, 11°–12° O 71° 40′ S, 11° 30′ O Alexander von Humboldt
Humboldt Trench The Humboldt search on the eastern edge of the Alexander von Humboldt Mountains 71° 45′ S, 11° 55′ O Alexander von Humboldt
Altar The altar 71° 36′ S, 11° 18′ O 71° 39′ S, 11° 23′ O marked Bergform
Amelang-Platte Ladfjella 74° S, 6° 12′–6° 30′ W 74° 5′ S, 5° 40′ W Herbert Amelang, 1st officer of the " Schwabenland "
At the overflow Gray renna east of the corner horns 71° 33′ S, 11° 37′ O glaciated pass
Barkley Mountains Barkleyfjella 72° 48′ S, 1° 30′–0° 48′ O 72° 23′ S, 1° 0′ O Erich Barkley (1912–1944), expedition biologist
Bastei The bastion 71° 18′ S, 13° 36′ O 71° 22′ S, 13° 32′ O striking mountain
Bludau Mountains Hallgrenskarvet and Heksegryta Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 73° 25′ S, 3° 30′ O Josef Bludau (1889–1967), Expeditionsarzt
Bolle-Berg 72° 18′ S, 6° 30′ O Herbert Bolle, Deutsche Lufthansa , foreman of the aircraft fitters
Boreas Boreas 71° 18′ S, 3° 57′ W Dornier Wal D-AGAT "Boreas", one of the two expedition aircraft
Brandt-Berg 72° 13′ S, 1° 0′ O Emil Brandt (* 1900), sailor, saved a comrade from drowning
Bruns Mountains 72° 05′ S, 1° 0′ O Herbert Bruns (* 1908), electrical engineer of the expedition ship
Buddenbrock chain 71° 42′ S, 6° O 71° 52′ S, 5° 25′ O Friedrich Freiherr von Buddenbrock , Operations Manager for Atlantic Air Traffic at Deutsche Lufthansa
Bundermann chains Grytøyrfjellet 71° 48′–72° S, 3° 24′ O 72° 0′ S, 4° 30′ O Max Bundermann (* 1904), aerial photographer
Conrad Mountains Conradfjella 71° 42′–72° 18′ S, 10° 30′ O 71° 50′ S, 9° 45′ O Fritz Conrad
Dallmann Mountains Dallmannfjellet 71 ° 42′ – 72 ° S, just west of 11 ° E 71° 48′ S, 10° 30′ O Eduard Dallmann
Drygalski-Berge Drygalskifjella 71° 6′–71° 48′ S, 7° 6′–9° 30′ O[2] 71° 50′ S, 8° 15′ O Erich von Drygalski
Corner corners The corner horns North end of the Alexander von Humboldt Mountains 71° 32′ S, 11° 28′ O marked Bergform
Filchner Mountains Filchnerfjella 71° 6′–71° 48′ S, 7° 6′–9° 30′ O[2] 72° 0′ S, 7° 30′ O Wilhelm Filchner
Gablenz back 72°–72° 18′ S, 5° O Carl August von Gablenz
Gburek tips Gburektoppane 72° 42′ S, 0° 48′–1° 10′ W 72° 10′ S, 0° 10′ W Leo Gburek (1910–1941), Geomagnetiker
Geßner tip Gessnertind 71° 54′ S, 6° 54′ O 71° 44′ S, 6° 54′ O Wilhelm Geßner (1890–1945), director of Hansa Luftbild
Gneiss head Gneisskolten 71° 54′ S, 12° 12′ O 71° 56′ S, 12° 6′ O distinctive peak
Gockel comb Precults 73° 12′ S, 0° 12′ W 73° 3′ S, 1° 54′ W Wilhelm Gockel, expedition meteorologist
Gray horns The gray horns South corner of the northern part of the Petermann range 71° 37′ S, 12° 13′ O striking peaks
Gruber Mountains Slokstallen and Petrellfjellet 72° S, 4° O 72° 0′ S, 4° 50′ O Erich Gruber (1912–1940), radio operator from D-AGAT "Boreas"
Habermehl summit Habermehltoppen just west of the Geßner peak 71° 48′ S, 6° 54′ O Richard Habermehl , head of the Reich Weather Service
Haedrich-Berg 71° 57′ S, 6° 12′ O 72° 4′ S, 4° 50′ O Willy Hädrich, authorized signatory at Deutsche Lufthansa, responsible for accounting for the expedition
Hedden-Berg 72° 8′ S, 1° 10′ O Karl Hedden, sailor, saved a comrade from drowning
Herrmann Mountains 73° S, 0°–1° O 72° 34′ S, 0° 30′ O Ernst Herrmann (explorer) , geologist of the expedition
In the bowl Grautfatet in the north of the Alexander von Humboldt Mountains 71° 34′ S, 11° 30′ O glaciated valley
Johannes Müller comb Miller's combs 72° 11′ S, 8° 8′ O Johannes Müller († 1941), participant in the 2nd German South Pole Expedition 1911/12, head of the nautical department of North German Lloyd
Kaye-Kamm Langfloget 72° 30′ S, 4° 48′ O 72° 7′ S, 4° 20′ O Georg Kaye, naval construction officer, looked after the Lufthansa ships
Kleinschmidt summit end up Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 73° 40′ S, 4° 15′ O Ernst Kleinschmidt, German Naval Observatory
Kottas Mountains Milorgfjella 74° 6′–74° 18′ S, 8° 12′–9° W 74° 20′ S, 9° 45′ W Alfred Kottas , captain of the Schwabenland
Kraul Mountains Vestfjella 73° 10′ S, 14° 0′ W Otto Kraul , ice pilot
Kruger Mountain Kvitskarvet 73° 6′ S, 1° 18′ O 72° 36′ S, 0° 57′ O Walter Krüger, meteorologist on the expedition
Cube Cube 72° 24′ S, 7° 30′ O 71° 59′ S, 7° 20′ O marked Bergform
Short Mountains Kurzefjella 72° 6′–72° 30′ S, 9° 30′–10° O 71° 55′ S, 9° 0′ O Friedrich Kurz , Vice-Admiral, Head of the Nautical Department of the High Command of the Navy
Long plate 71° 58′ S, 0° 25′ O Heinz Lange (1908-1943), Meteorology Wizard
Loesener plate Skorvetangen , Hamarskorvene and Kvithamaren 72° S, 4° 18′ O 72° 2′ S, 5° 10′ O Kurt Loesener, aircraft mechanic from D-AGAT "Boreas"
Lose Platte Lausflæet 71° 38′ S, 11° 17′ O marked Bergform
Luz back 72°–72° 18′ S, 5° 30′ O Martin Luz, commercial director at German Lufthansa
Mayr chain Jutulsessen 72°–72° 18′ S, 3° 24′ O 72° 3′ S, 2° 45′ O Rudolf Mayr , pilot of D-ALOX "Passat"
Matterhorn Ulvetanna highest peak in the Drygalskibergen 71° 52′ S, 8° 20′ O marked Bergform
Mentzel-Berg Mentzelfjellet 71° 18′ S, 13° 42′ O 71° 22′ S, 13° 39′ O Rudolf Mentzel
Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains Mühlig-Hofmannfjella 71° 48′–72° 36′ S, 3° O 72° 0′ S, 4° 30′ O Albert Mühlig-Hofmann
Neumayer steep face Neumayerskarvet 73° 10′ S, 1° 50′ W Georg von Neumayer
New Swabia 72° 0′ S, 5° 0′ O Expedition ship " Schwabenland "
Northwest Island Northwest Island North end of the Alexander von Humboldt Mountains 71° 27′ S, 11° 35′ O inselartige Nunatakgruppe
Eastern high field Austre Høgskeidet between the southern and central section of the Petermann range 71° 50′ S, 12° 10′ O Tongue of ice
Ober-See Øvresjøen 71° 12′ S, 13° 42′ O 71° 17′ S, 13° 39′ O frozen lake
Passat Passat 71° 18′ S, 3° 55′ O Donier Wal D-ALOX
Paulsen-Berge Brattskarvet , Vendeholten and Vendehø 72° 24′ S, 1° 30′ O 72° 10′ S, 1° 20′ O Karl-Heinz Paulsen , oceanographer of the expedition
Pay-Gruppe Payerfjella 72° 0′ S, 14° 42′ O 72° 0′ S, 14° 35′ O Julius von Payer
Penck-Mulde Pencksøkket 73° 0′ S, 3° 0′ W Albrecht Penck
Petermann chains Petermannkjeda between the Alexander Humboldt Mountains and the "central Wohlthatmassiv" [= Otto von Gruber Mountains ] at 71 ° 18′ – 72 ° 9 ′ S 71° 40′ S, 12° 20′ O August Petermann
Preuschoff back Hochlinfjellet 72° 18′–72° 30′ S, 4° 30′ O 72° 5′ S, 4° 0′ O Franz Preuschoff, aircraft mechanic from D-ALOX "Passat"
Regula chain Regulakjeda 72° 36′ S, 3° 0′ W Herbert Regula (1910–1980), first meteorologist on the expedition
Ritscher summit Ritschertind 71° 24′ S, 13° 24′ O 71° 24′ S, 13° 20′ O Alfred Ritscher
Ritscher-Land Ritscherflya 72° 30′ S, 3° 30′ W Alfred Ritscher
Röbke-Berg The ice edge 73° 8′ S, 4° 28′ W Karl-Heinz Röbke (* 1909), 2nd officer of the "Schwabenland"
Ruhnke-Berg Fortifications 72° 30′ S, 4° O 72° 8′ S, 3° 40′ O Herbert Ruhnke (1904–1944), radio operator of D-ALOX "Passat"
Sauter bars The cube joint 72° 36′ S, 3° 18′ O 72° 10′ S, 2° 45′ O Siegfried Sauter , aerial photographer
Schirmacher Lake District [3] Umbrella oases 70° 40′ S, 11° 40′ O 70° 45′ S, 11° 40′ O Richardheinrich Schirmacher, pilot of D-AGAT "Boreas"
Schneider bars 73° 42′ S, 3° 18′ W Hans Schneider, Head of the Equipment Department at North German Lloyd
Schubert summit Høgfonna and Ovbratten Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 72° 47′ S, 3° 43′ O Otto von Schubert, head of the nautical department at the Deutsche Seewarte
Schulz heights Lagfjella 73° 42′ S, 7° 36′ W 74° 6′ S, 6° 30′ O Robert Schulz, II. Engineer of the "Schwabenland"
Layer mountains Sjiktberga 71° 24′ S, 13° 12′ O 71° 26′ S, 13° 7′ O
Black horns Svarthorna South corner of the northern part of the Petermann range 71° 35′ S, 12° 34′ O marked Bergform
Lake head Sjøhausen 71° 12′ S, 13° 48′ O 71° 17′ S, 13° 42′ O striking mountain
Seilkopf Mountains Nälegga Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 72° 38′ S, 3° 40′ W Heinrich Seilkopf , head of the sea-flight department of the German Seewarte and professor of meteorology
Sphinx head Sphinxskolten at the northern end of the Petermann chain 71° 27′ S, 11° 57′ O striking mountain
Spit summit Huldreslottet Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 72° 58′ S, 3° 50′ W Admiral Fritz Spieß , commander of the research vessel Meteor
Stein-Kuppen Straumsnutane 71° 40′ S, 1° 30′ W Willy Stein, boatswain of the "Schwabenland"
Todt bars Todtskota 71° 18′ S, 14° 18′ O 71° 22′ S, 13° 55′ O Herbert Todt , assistant to the expedition leader
Uhlig summit Uhligberga Part of a 150 km long ridge between 72 ° 42 ′ S, 3 ° 30 ′ W and 74 ° S, 5 ° W 73° 50′ S, 5° 10′ W Karl Uhlig, Chief Engineer of "Schwabenland"
Under sea Nedresjøen 71° 18′ S, 13° 30′ O 71° 21′ S, 13° 28′ O frozen lake
outpost Forposten 71° 24′ S, 15° 48′ O 71° 30′ S, 15° 30′ O remote nunatak
Western high field Vestre Høgskeidet 71° 50′ S, 11° 30′ O glaciated plain
Weyprecht Mountains Weyprechtfjella 72° 0′ S, 13° 30′ O 72° 0′ S, 13° 30′ O Carl Weyprecht
Wegener Ice Sheet Wegerisen 73° 0′ S, 5° 0′ O Alfred Wegener
Witte tips Marsteinen, Valken, Krylen and Knotten 71° 30′ S, 2° 0′ W Dietrich Witte, engine manager of the "Schwabenland"
Wohlthat massif Wohlthatmassivet 71° 40′ S, 12° 30′ O Helmuth Wohlthat
Carpenter Mountain Carpenter's Fjellet 71° 18′ S, 13° 24′ O 71° 21′ S, 13° 20′ O Carl Zimmermann, Vice President of the German Research Foundation
Sugar Loaf Sukkertoppen 71° 24′ S, 13° 30′ O 71° 25′ S, 13° 27′ O marked Bergform
Zwieselberg Zwieselhøgda at the southern end of the eastern Petermann chain 71° 44′ S, 12° 8′ O

In addition, eight names appear on the map supplements to the expedition report edited by Otto von Gruber that were not published in the Federal Gazette in 1952.

Name Name on the Norwegian map Position
Cutting edge Madsensåta 71° 20′ S, 12° 36′ O
Cutting group Johnsonhorna 71° 21′ S, 12° 24′ O
Western Petermann chain Vestre Petermannkjeda 71° 36′ S, 12° 12′ O
Medium Petermann chain Middle Petermann chain 71° 30′ S, 12° 30′ O
Eastern Petermann chain Austre Petermann chain 71° 25′ S, 12° 40′ O
Great black horn Great Black Horn 71° 36′ S, 12° 33′ O
Felsinsel Hansenhovden 72° 23′ S, 1° 0′ O
Grabenhorn The search horn 71° 48′ S, 12° 2′ O

Remarks

  1. in the original spelling; the hyphen is omitted in modern spelling, with the exception of multi-part names such as Alexander-von-Humboldt-Gebirge
  2. a b Information for Drygalski and Filchner Mountains
  3. renamed the Schirmacher Oasis after the Antarctic Oases were defined as an independent object type

literature

  • K. Brunk: Cartographic work and German naming in Neuschwabenland, Antarctica . In: German Geodetic Commission, Series E: History and Development of Geodesy . Vol. 24 / I, 1986, pp. 1-42 ( Issue 24 Part 1 [PDF; accessed April 19, 2009]).
  • Directory of German geographical names in the Antarctic . In: Institute for Applied Geodesy (ed.): News from the map and surveying system . Special issue, 1993, p. 1–30 ( online version 2.14 from June 13, 2014 [accessed October 17, 2016]).
  • Alfred Ritscher: Scientific and aeronautical results of the German Antarctic Expedition 1938/39 . Koehler & Amelang, Leipzig 1942, p. 1–304.