6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68 - 6. Rheinisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 68

6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68

active May 5, 1860 to January 1919
State Kingdom of Prussia
Armed forces Prussian Army
Branch of service Infantry
Insinuation VIII. Armee-Korps
Former locations Koblenz
Soldiers of the 6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68 in front of the Koblenz main guard (1911)

The sixth Rhenish Infantry Regiment. 68 was an infantry joined the Prussian army .

story

The regiment's barracks on the Karthauser

The association was established on May 5, 1860 (Foundation Day ) and emerged from the Landwehr Infantry Regiment No. 28 in the course of Roon's army reform and increase. Staff, 1st and 2nd battalions were stationed in Koblenz , the fusilier battalion in Cologne . On May 7, 1861 it was named 6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68 . In March 1864 the regiment moved to Luxembourg as a new garrison . From 1868/71 parts were in Jülich , 1887/94 in Diez . Otherwise the regiment was in Koblenz and Ehrenbreitstein until 1918 , also in the Ehrenbreitstein Fortress, from 1894 then completely in Koblenz. From 1902 the III. Battalion the newly built Hereditary Grand Duke Friedrich Barracks in front of Grand Duke Constantine's Fort on the Karthauser; the other two battalions were in the Spitzberg barracks and in the fortress of Emperor Alexander .

Right: Tambour and detector of the 6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68, 1917

German war

After the regiment had received the mobilization order on May 5, 1866 on the occasion of the German War , the association moved via Konz to Cologne and from there to the meeting point of the VIII Army Corps in Halle (Saale) , where it arrived at the end of the month. With the 15th Division it took part in the battles of Münchengrätz and Königgrätz in the Elbarmee .

Franco-German War

Within the 15th Division in the VIII Army Corps, the battle near Bertaucourt les Thennes, battles near Amiens and the Hallue , battle near Sapignies , battle near Bapaume , battle near Tertry - Pœuilly , battle near Saint-Quentin and enclosure of Metz .

First World War

With the outbreak of the First World War , the regiment mobilized on August 2, 1914 . As part of the 30th Infantry Brigade of the 16th Division , it took part in the deployment in Luxembourg .

1914

  • 22nd to 23rd August - Battle of the Meuse (Neufchâteau- Donchery )
  • August 30th to September 5th - Pursuit from the Meuse to the Marne (September 3rd near Somme-Py)
  • 0 6th to 12th September - Battle of the Marne (6th September at Vitry-le-François )
  • September 13th to December 19th - Trench warfare in the Champagne / Souain
  • December 20-30 - Battle of Souain
  • from December 31st - trench warfare in Champagne

1915

  • until 7 January 1915 - trench warfare in Champagne
  • 0 January 8-13 - Battle of Perthes-lès-Hurlus
  • January 14th to February 19th - Trench warfare in Champagne
  • February 20th to March 20th - Winter battle in Champagne
  • March 21st to 31st - Trench warfare in Champagne
  • 0 April 1 to 13 - Quiet with Sedan and Briey
  • May 13th to June 19th - Battle of La Bassée and Arras (Loretto / Vimy-Höhe)
  • June 20-30 - rest
  • from June 30th - fighting on the Aisne (Laon, Chemin des Dames)

1916

  • until July 28th - fighting on the Aisne ( Laon , Chemin des Dames )
  • July 29th to August 25th - Battle of the Somme / Thiepval
  • August 25th to September 1st - rest near Laon
  • 0 September 1st to October 4th - Job battles at la-Ville-aux-Bois
  • 0 October 4th to 30th - Battles on the Somme
  • 0 November 4th to 15th - Fights on the Aisne / Pommieres
  • from November 25th - trench warfare on the upper Styr - Stochod / Volhynia

1917

  • until May 19 - trench warfare on upper Styr-Stochod / Volhynia
  • 23. Mai bis 4. June - Reserve
  • 0 June 5 to 10 - Reserve in Dun-sur-Meuse
  • June 10-23 - Reserve in Lille
  • June 25th to September 3rd - Fights in the Wytschaete Arch in Flanders
  • 0 September 3 to 28 - rest in Bruges
  • 0 October 4th to 19th - Fights in Flanders / Poelkapelle-Westrosebeke
  • October 19 to November 17 - rest in Antwerp
  • from November 21 - defensive battles in Flanders / Becelaere

1918

  • until January 17th - defensive battles in Flanders / Becelaere
  • January 18th to February 18th - Quiet in Ghent
  • February 19 to April 4 - Trench warfare in Flanders / Passendale
  • 0 April 9-18 - Battle of Armentières
  • April 19 to May 2 - Trench warfare in northern France
  • 0 May 3 to 11 - rest in Emmerin
  • May 14th to July 4th - Defensive battles on the Lys
  • 0 July 4th to 14th - rest in Lille
  • July 15 to August 4 - defensive battles on the Lys
  • August 30th to September 2nd - Battle of Hendecourt
  • 0 September 3 to 10 - Fights at Arleux
  • September 10-27 - rest in Lille
  • September 27th to November 6th - defensive battles in the Hermann-Schelde position
  • 06. bis 11. November – Reserve

3,832 members of the regiment died in this war.

Whereabouts

After the end of the war, the remnants of the regiment began marching back home from Liège on November 19, 1918. From December 9, 1918, it was demobilized in Bramsche near Osnabrück and finally dissolved in January 1919. A security company was formed from parts, which was active in the volunteer battalion Rhineland and in October 1919 as III. Battalion was transferred to the Reichswehr Infantry Regiment 19. [1]

The tradition in the Reichswehr was adopted by the 4th Company of the 16th Infantry Regiment by decree of the Chief of Army Command, General of the Infantry Hans von Seeckt , on August 24, 1921 .

Regimentschefs

Rank Name Date [2]
General of the Infantry Albert von Barnekow September 14, 1872 to May 24, 1895
Ferdinand of Romania January 27, 1899 to August 27, 1916

Commanders

Rank Name Date [3]
Oberst Albert von Barnekow 0 July 1, 1860 to January 8, 1864
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Wilhelm von Gayl 0 January 9, 1864 to March 4, 1867
Oberst Bernhard von Schkopp 0 April 4, 1867 to June 17, 1869
Oberst Julius von Sommerfeld June 18, 1869 to December 15, 1870
Oberst Adolf von Hertzberg December 16, 1870 to July 3, 1872
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Wilhelm von Kienitz July 18, 1872 to April 12, 1878
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Emil Fischer April 13-19, 1878 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Emil von Fischer April 20, 1878 to December 5, 1883
Oberst Ferdinand von Esebeck 0 December 6, 1883 to July 13, 1885
Oberst Gustav Ahlborn July 14, 1885 to August 18, 1888
Oberst August Schultze August 19, 1888 to October 14, 1889
Oberst Wilhelm von Arentsschildt October 15, 1889 to January 26, 1893
Oberst Eduard Sperling January 27, 1893 to October 17, 1895
Oberst Ernst Schuler from Senden October 18, 1895 to February 15, 1899
Oberst Adolf von Kries February 16, 1899 to April 21, 1902
Oberst Vincentius de Paula von Brixen April 22, 1902 to April 9, 1906
Oberst Theodor Claassen April 10, 1906 to January 26, 1909
Oberst Max Stumpff January 27, 1909 to January 26, 1912
Oberst Erich von Pochhammer January 27, 1912 to August 26, 1914
Oberst Alfred Dieterich August 27 to December 23, 1914
Lieutenant colonel Karl Anders December 24, 1914 to March 16, 1915
Lieutenant colonel Friedrich Muller March 17, 1915 to July 29, 1917
Lieutenant colonel Viktor Bauernstein July 30, 1917 to March 23, 1918
Major Heinrich von Kummer March 24 to April 13, 1918
Lieutenant colonel Emil Lange April 14, 1918 to January 23, 1919

Commemorative plaque

At the main cemetery in Koblenz , a plaque in the hall of honor in the grove of honor for the fallen of the First World War commemorates the dead of the regiment.

literature

  • Jürgen Kraus : Handbook of the associations and troops of the German army 1914-1918. Part VI: Infantry. Volume 1: Infantry Regiments. Verlag Militaria, Vienna 2007, ISBN 978-3-902526-14-4 , p. 127.
  • Friedrich Bertkau: History of the 6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68. Groos, Koblenz 1908.
  • Fritz Pafferath: The history of the 6th Rhenish Infantry Regiment No. 68 in the world wars 1914–1918. At the instigation of the Association of Officers of the Former Infantry Regiment No. 68 ed. v. Fritz Pafferath, printed and published by Franz Weber, Berlin 1930.
  • Manfred Böckling: This new accommodation was a major step forward. The Hereditary Grand Duke Friedrich Barracks in front of Fort Konstantin. In: Fort Konstantin. Historic place with a future. For the 20th anniversary of the PRO KONSTANTIN association (1993–2013), publisher: PRO KONSTANTIN e. V. Overall editing: Sebastian Gleixner, Garwain Verlag, Koblenz 2013, ISBN 978-3-936436-24-2 , pp. 67–82.

Individual evidence

  1. ^ Jürgen Kraus: Handbook of the units and troops of the German army 1914-1918. Part VI: Infantry. Volume 1: Infantry Regiments. Verlag Militaria, Vienna 2007, ISBN 978-3-902526-14-4 , p. 127.
  2. Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The staffing of the active infantry regiments as well as the hunter and machine gun battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag. Osnabrück 1992. ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 . P. 185.
  3. Günter Wegmann (Ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The staffing of the active infantry regiments, as well as jäger and MG battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , pp. 185–187 .