7th Panzer Division (NVA) - 7. Panzerdivision (NVA)

7. Panzerdivision (7. PD)

active August 20, 1956 to October 2, 1990
State German Democratic RepublicGerman Democratic Republic (land of war flag) DDR
Armed forces National Peoples Army
Armed forces Land forces of the NVA
Branch of service Armored force
Type Armored Division
structure structure
Strength Should: 12,750 (war) [1] ;
9.139 (peace)
Insinuation Military District III (Peace)

3rd Army (NVA) (war) [1]

headquarters Dresden ( location )
equipment equipment
Commanders
list of Commanders

The 7th Panzer Division (short: 7th PD ) [2] was a large association of the National People's Army of the German Democratic Republic .

history

Origin of the military formations

Structure of the mechanical readiness of the CIP using the example: Dresden (1955)

As early as the creation of the Barracked People's Police (KVP) [3] in the early 1950s, in addition to infantry formations, mechanized formations were set up, including the Mech. Readiness Dresden of the KVP. [4] The main demand from the Soviet Union for original GDR armed forces only became public after the Bundeswehr was created in the Federal Republic of Germany in November 1955 . [5] [6]

On January 18, 1956, the People's Chamber of the GDR, after consulting the SED leadership with the CPSU Central Committee, passed the law "on the creation of the National People's Army and the Ministry of National Defense". For the operational formations of the KVP, the preparations for the conversion to regular armed forces of the GDR began de facto as early as late autumn 1955 . The first meeting of the states participating in the Warsaw Treaty at the end of January 1956 provided important guidance for the structure, structure, equipment and training . The armed contingents to be created by the NVA should be able to be integrated into the United Armed Forces. [7]

It was planned to set up mechanized divisions [8] (two MD), infantry divisions (three ID) and tank divisions (three PD) structured according to the Soviet model . As early as the summer of 1956, changes were required based on the latest Soviet ideas about the structure, equipment and deployment of the armed forces. The infantry divisions and mechanized divisions of the NVA under construction were transformed into motorized rifle divisions and tank divisions as an extension of the original command 1/56 by order 99/56 of the minister of October 17, 1956. [9]

The Ministry of National Defense (MfNV) formed on March 1, 1956 [10] assigned these formations to the two commandos of the military districts ( KMB-III and KMB-V ) of the land forces. [11] From the stock of the commandos, an army command was formed in the field service. The 7th Panzer Division to be set up (location of the staff - Dresden) was assigned to KMB III (location Leipzig), as the responsible military command body in the southern territory [12] of the GDR. From 1972 the Land Forces Command was formed, which led the two military districts on behalf of the MfNV. [13]

Establishment and assignment of the 7th PD

In the spring of 1956, the Dresden Mech. Readiness units moved the KVP (staff in the Dresden Albertstadt barracks) from their locations to the Nochten military camp for training, construction work and the reorganization . The 7th Panzer Division of Military District III of the GDR was formed there by August 1956. Colonel Werner Pilz was entrusted with leading the reorganization of the Mech. Readiness Dresden of the KVP into the 7th Panzer Division and the expansion of the barracks and training areas. According to the order of the minister about cadre No. 466/56 of August 18, 1956, he had the newly formed troops at Colonel Heinrich Brandesand was transferred to the minister’s reserve. The 7th Panzer Division was put into service and sworn in on August 20, 1956 when the troop flag was handed over to Colonel Heinrich Brandes. [14] [15]

The basis for the creation of this type of association was largely the armored division of the Soviet Army . In later years their structure corresponded to a staff of more than 9,000 in garrison service. In contrast to the armored divisions of the Soviet Army, the armored divisions of the NVA had no combat helicopters and had fewer combat forces in the case of motorized riflemen and tank formations. [13]

According to the constitution [16] [17] , the mandate of the 7th PD was that this tactical association of the NVA in alliance with the coalition forces “protects and protects the peaceful life of the citizens of the GDR and all states of the socialist community against any attacks by aggressive forces the sovereignty of the GDR, its protection of the territorial integrity of the GDR as well as the inviolability of its borders and its state security are guaranteed. " [18] From 1962 the division was responsible for actions in the operational groups (army, army corps) of any participating states of the United Nations' First Strategic Staff Armed forces planned for the Western Theater of War (WKSP).

Military training in the 7th PD

The training in the 7th Panzer Division, referred to as combat training for the troops, was aimed at learning the military craft well. In the vicinity of the site, the training was not subject to any restrictions due to the demand for constant combat readiness. Since the 1970s, with the introduction of new training programs, the training has been carried out in five stages in each half-year (December – May or June – November): [19]

Training stages motorized rifle and tank troops according to the program from 1981
  • Basic military training of the newly called up as well as the preparation of the technology, armament and training base for the next period of use (winter or summer).
  • Military individual training in the respective service position;
  • Unit training (group, platoon, company) and “complex training” of several branches of arms as well as the creation of unity for battalions / departments;
  • Tactical exercises with and without combat shooting;
  • Final inspection or inspection, usually combined with exercises by the units and the division;

Exercise activity in the 7th PD

In the course of this training organization it was ensured that the conscript would take part in one or two exercises at the company / battery level and in an equal number of exercises at the battalion / department level during his service. The 7th PD also completed: [20]

  • Every two years a troop exercise of the division or a command post exercise for the staffs of the division and the troop units, with the participation of representation troops;
  • In the years without divisional exercises, the commanding bodies of the 7th PD conducted tactical exercises for the regiments (PR, MSR) with and without combat shooting;
  • participation in maneuvers in the coalition stock (see below).

Participation in exercises and maneuvers in the coalition

The preparation for actions in the coalition population determined the exercise practice of the regiments and in particular of the management organs of the 7th PD, including: [21]

  • September 1961 - Participation of the AR-7 in the coalition of the divisional artillery group of the 5th PD (PL) in a troop exercise in the VR Poland;
  • September 1962 - Participation of MSR-7 in the coalition (ČS, SU) in the troop exercise “Wind” (cs - “Vitr”) in the ČSSR ;
  • September 1963 - Participation in the coalition (ČS, PL, SU) in the “Quartet” maneuver in the south of the GDR;
  • March 1964 - Inspection by the United Forces High Command in MSR-7;
  • October 1965 - Participation in the coalition (ČS, PL, SU) in the “Oktobersturm” maneuver in the southwest of the GDR;
  • September 1966 - Participation with the PR-15 tank regiment in the coalition (ČS, PL, SU) in the maneuver “ Moldau ” (cs - “Vltava”) in the south-west of the ČSSR;
  • August 1967 - Participation in the coalition stock (SU) in the troop exercise “Foil” with parts of the 11th MSD;
  • July / August 1968 - Participation in the coalition (BG, HU, PL, SU) in the operation "Danube" (ru - операция "Дунай") with the 11th MSD;
  • September 1970 - Participation in the coalition stock (WVO) in the maneuver "Brotherhood of Arms 70" in the GDR;
  • September 1972 - Participation in the coalition (ČS, PL, SU) in maneuvers "Schild-72" in the ČSSR;
  • September 1976 - Division exercise / participation in the coalition group (ČS, PL, SU) in the troop exercise "Shield-76" in Poland;
  • March 1979 - Inspection by the MfNV in MSR-7;
  • September 1980 - participation parts / 7. PD in the coalition stock (WVO) on the maneuver "Brotherhood of Arms 80" in the GDR and in the Baltic Sea equatorium;
  • August 1981 - Participation parts / 7. PD (MSR-7, AR-7) and parts / 9. PD (PR-21, AR-9) at the troop exercise in the coalition (NVA, PL) "Delfin-81" in the southeast of the GDR and northwest of the VR Poland;
  • July 1982 - Participation in the coalition (PL, SU) in the operational-tactical exercise "Hauptschlag" in the GDR;
  • May / June 1983 - Participation in the coalition stock (WVO) in the command post exercise “Soyuz-83” in the GDR, ČSSR, VR Poland;
  • September 1984 - Participation with MSR-7 in the coalition (BG, ČS, HU, ROM, SU) in the troop exercise “Schild-84” in ČSSR;
  • September 1987 - Inspection by the MfNV in MSR-7.

Establishing higher levels of readiness (1961, 1962)

On August 13, 1961, the 7th PD was transferred to the level of "increased combat readiness" in the barracks by the Minister for National Defense and the deployment of one battalion (a department) on duty was organized in the regiments. The service period of those to be dismissed in autumn was initially extended to the end of December 1961. As of September 23, the division continued normal operations. The training of the volunteers who followed the initiative of the Central Council of the youth association “Free German Youth” (FDJ) on August 16, 1961, took place in the training regiment of the 7th PD. The volunteers who were about to be released were transferred to the reserve at the end of April 1962.

In connection with the tense military-political situation between the United States and the Soviet Union in the " Cuban Missile Crisis ", the "increased combat readiness" for the United Armed Forces of the Warsaw Treaty was ordered for the first time on October 23, 1962. According to order 104/62 of the minister, the 7th PD also established the higher level of readiness. The related exit and holiday ban, the postponement of the autumn layoffs and the activities of the willingness to mobilize ended on November 21, 1962.

Actions in the "Moldau" maneuver (1966)

In the autumn of 1966, NVA troops were supposed to practice for the first time in real life alongside the allied armies on the southwestern territory of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (ČSSR). [22] In addition to the 11 Mot. Rifle Division (NVA) Panzer Regiment PR-15 was included the 7th PD (NVA) in the maneuver "Moldau" United Forces from 19 to 22 September 1966th On September 19, the NVA maneuver troops crossed the state border with the ČSSR, moved into their accommodation rooms and were placed under the armed forces of the ČSSR as an army reserve. "The Czechoslovak population received the East German soldiers very kindly, even if the NVA uniforms evoked memories of the German occupation in many of the citizens." [23] The 7th PD (NVA) was able to demonstrate its military skills and the military cooperation with the allied armed forces.

Actions of the 7th PD on the "Prague Spring" (1968)

Under pressure from the people of the ČSSR, the Czechoslovak Communist Party (KPČS) under Alexander Dubček began to implement a liberalization and democratization program (“ Prague Spring ”) in the spring of 1968 . From the start, the Soviet military were among the staunch opponents of the Prague reformers. The discovery of a special NATO operation plan "Zephyr" and the information about the establishment of a special staff of the NATO High Command Europe to "deal with the Czechoslovak problem" as well as the corps maneuver of the Bundeswehr "Black Lion" planned for October 1968 near the border with the Czechoslovakia were rated as a military threat by the Warsaw contracting states. [24]

The Warsaw Pact's reaction to these assessments of the situation was the operational, tactical and logistical preparation of an intervention by means of exercises and maneuvers as normal joint training measures for the allied armed forces.

At the beginning / middle of July 1968, when the situation in Czechoslovakia came to a head, Walter Ulbricht agreed to the proposal of the commander-in-chief of the Warsaw Pact, Marshal Jakubowski , including NVA troops, the 7th Panzer Division and the 11th Motorized Rifle Division in a military intervention (Operation “Danube” - ru. Операция “Дунай”). [25]

By the early morning of July 29, 1968, the 7th Panzer Division moved to the Nochten military training area - the staff near Boxberg .

The 7th PD (NVA) was placed in full combat readiness under the 20th Guards Army (GSSD, staff in Eberswalde / Finow), which acted in the 1st operational squadron of the Danube group and was supposed to advance into Czechoslovakia from the northwest. The plan was to set up a "military command of the area" by forces of the 7th PD (NVA) in the border area as well as in parts of the north Bohemian district, [26] since it was used in the second season of the 20th GA (SU).

In the evening hours of August 20, 1968, the 7th PD made ready to march in the occupied concentration room, awaiting the signal to advance. But the high command of the group renounced the extensive control of the North Bohemian territory and the 7th PD (NVA) remained in the previous (provision) area as the reserve of the commander in chief. She did not leave the Nochten Training Area.

On October 16, 1968, the operational subordination of the 7th PD (NVA) was lifted. On the instructions of the MfNV, the combined relocation of forces and resources to the garrison locations began. Organized by party and state officials, the returning troops were welcomed by the local population. On October 21, 1968, all units of the participating NVA divisions were back in their barracks . [27]

Use of the 7th PD in business and in disasters

When the 7th PD was put into service, it was given tasks to “use forces and resources in the national economy” and to remedy the consequences of disasters. These were: [15]

  • in the 1950s / 1960s harvest aid in summer and autumn as well as aid in the coal industry;
  • since the beginning of the 1970s support for state building projects (e.g. Palace of the Republic Berlin, Altenberg racing sled and bobsled run );
  • Assignment of skilled workers to the chemical, microelectronic and lignite industries;
  • Disaster relief (e.g. dam failure in 1967 in Altenberg; floods on the Elbe , Gottleuba and Neisse ; cold snap 1979/80, 1986/87).

From 1980 up to 1,200 members of the 7th PD were involved in these tasks every year and did not take part in military training. From March 1989 these forces were brought together and managed by training base 6 (Abas-6, Grossenhain location).

Effects of the one-sided GDR disarmament initiative in 1989

On January 23, 1989 the National Defense Council of the GDR declared in the context of the political dialogue on the reduction of armed forces and conventional armaments in Europe the readiness of the GDR to make a constructive one-sided contribution to the disarmament process. In addition to the demobilization of 10,000 soldiers, six tank regiments and one air squadron were to be disbanded. [28]

For the 7th PD, the implementation of the disarmament proposal meant the dissolution of the PR-16 tank regiment and reductions in the tank battalion of the MSR-7 motorized rifle regiment. Since the PR-16 was already fully equipped with the most modern tank type T-72 M, this technology was regrouped to T-72 at the end of the ongoing conversion of the PD. [29] From the other units of the 7th PD, the older T-55 battle tanks were handed over for demilitarization by the end of the 1989 training year.

At the Grossenhain site, training base 6 (Abas-6) [30] was set up in March 1989 , which had a tank training battalion with T-72 M tanks, a motorized rifle battalion (MSB) with work commandos (economics) and security units. [15]

Deployment of forces to the political crisis (autumn 1989)

The intensified internal political crises in the GDR after the May elections in 1989 culminated on October 4th at Dresden Central Station with the permitted transit of those wishing to leave Prague. To support the police forces in warding off escalating violence, forces from the 7th PD were made available as “non-structural hundreds” at several locations. [31]

At the end of October 1989, the growing number of people leaving the siting districts of Dresden, Cottbus and Karl-Marx-Stadt gave rise to serious problems with supplying private households with coal and with the delivery of everyday goods. From November 1989 to January 1990 the forces and resources of the 7th PD (1,700 members of the army, including 500 military drivers, up to 150 trucks, medical vehicles, tankers) were used to supply the population.

At the end of November 1989, the replenishment of staff was complicated by the early dismissals of 930 army members with important professions (Reichsbahn, medical sector, etc.).

At the beginning of 1990, after the protests of the soldiers in Beelitz, there were also actions of the soldiers at locations of the 7th PD (Dresden, Zeithain). The decision of the Defense Minister, Admiral Theodor Hoffmann , to dismiss the basic military service in the third half of the year early at the end of January 1990 (instead of April) and not to replenish them in May and not to call up any reservists, meant a permanent reduction in the level of replenishment of the 7th PD to below 60 percent . [15] Despite this tense situation, the security for personnel, combat technology, weapons and ammunition in the objects was ensured by October 2, 1990. [32]

Effects of the change in political leadership in 1990

Exchange - NVA cap cockade, national coat of arms in black, red and gold, after a change of leadership in mid-1990.

The political power structures, of which the 7th PD was a component, had to undergo a change in political leadership as a result of the Volkskammer elections of March 1990. The new Minister for Disarmament and Defense (MfAV) Rainer Eppelmann nourished hopes for the continued existence of independent armed forces:

  • The minister subsequently proclaimed an army of 100,000 men.
  • In July 1990, he had members of the armed forces sworn in on the state flag of the GDR.

The process of self-correction and renewal of military life in the 7th PD came to a standstill with the rapid German unification process at the beginning of August 1990 at the latest.

With order no. 48/90 of the MfAV [33] the honorary names of the NVA troops were dropped . On September 30, 1990, by order of the minister, all generals and most of the professional soldiers with a thirty to forty year service period were dismissed .

Dissolution of the 7th PD (1990)

With the accession of the German Democratic Republic to the Federal Republic of Germany, the NVA and thus its structural element 7th Panzer Division was dissolved on October 2, 1990.

By then, despite the tense situation, the superiors of all levels had managed to guarantee the security of the military objects, to carry out the ammunition of the combat technology in a timely manner and without losses, and to prepare all security-relevant technology, equipment and reserves for a complete handover. Reconnaissance groups of the army of the German armed forces had started their activities in the locations of the 7th PD. [34] Individual members of the army remained in the sites until the handover. The division commander, Colonel Volker Bednara, was entrusted with preparing the handover. [35]

Military and civilian employees of the NVA were released from their duties by ministerial order . Closing roll calls with civilian and military personnel took place at the locations. [15] The troop flags were rolled up and carried from the square. The remaining members of the NVA had received a notification that they would be used in the Bundeswehr. [36]

With the entry into force of the Unification Treaty, the Federal Minister of Defense took over command and control over the German armed forces in eastern Germany on October 3, 1990.

The troops of the previous 7th PD were subordinated to the Bundeswehr Command East (location Strausberg) as structural elements as well as the remaining personnel from October 3, 1990 and were affiliated to Military Area VII (location Leipzig), Commander Major General Ekkehard Richter , [37] and from the previous one Commander Colonel Volker Bednara led to the handover.

The handover to the Bundeswehr, Brigadier General Andreas Wittenberg, took place on October 5, 1990 during a roll call with the participation of representatives from all units of the division and officers from the Bundeswehr takeover command. Colonel Bednara remained in active service until the end of the year in the interests of an orderly handover from Brigadier General Wittenberg.

In the years from 1990 to 1993, at the eight locations in the Free State of Saxony and the State of Brandenburg, the majority of the 12 barracks used by the 7th PD were closed and made available for civilian use. The following remained in use by the Bundeswehr: a barracks in Dresden (from 1996 converted into an army officers' school ), a barracks in Frankenberg / Sa. (from 1991 staff and units of the Heimatschutzbrigade 37 ), [38] a barracks in Marienberg ( Jägerbataillon 371 ).

Commanders

Rank at that time Name Period
Oberst Heinrich Brandes August 20, 1956 - August 15, 1958
Oberst Franz Rös September 1, 1958 - October 31, 1960
Oberst Joachim Goldbach November 1, 1960 - July 31, 1964
Major general Werner Winter August 1, 1964 - November 8, 1971
Major general Hans victory November 9, 1971 - October 31, 1976
Major general Walter Müller November 1, 1976 - October 31, 1979
Major general Günter Möckel November 1, 1979 - June 30, 1985
Oberst Klaus Listemann July 1, 1985 - September 30, 1987
Oberst Volker Bednara October 1, 1987 - October 2, 1990

Organisation

Information on the classification, structure and location of the 7th PD (1990)

The division, structure, equipment with technology and armament of the troops and units as well as the occupancy of the 7th Panzer Division were subject to multiple changes and additions.

The following tables relate to the situation and data in September 1990, shortly before the units and units were handed over to the Bundeswehr. [15] This was preceded by the dissolution of the PR-16 tank regiment at the Großenhain site in March 1989 and the simultaneous formation of the Abas-6 training base. [39] In addition, the dissolution of the RA-7 missile department had begun in May 1990 and after the missile technology was handed over to the Soviet armed forces, only residual forces remained at the Zeithain site. [15] [40]

Locations of the 7th Panzer Division of the NVA in 1990
Structure of a tank division
and a motorized rifle division (NVA)
Structure of a tank regiment of the National People's Army
unit Honorary name deployment
PR-14 tank regiment Karol Świerczewski Spremberg ( location )
PR-15 tank regiment Paul Hornick Cottbus ( location )
PR-16 tank regiment Leo Jogiches Grossenhain ( location )
Mot.-Protective Regiment MSR-7 Max Roscher Marienberg ( location )
Artillerieregiment AR-7 Albert Hößler Frankenberg / Sa. ( Location )
Fla Rocket Regiment FRR-7 Paul Rockstroh[41] Zeithain ( location )
Missile Division RA-7 Alfred Kurella Zeithain ( location )
Shotgun Department GeWA-7 Ernst Schneller Frankenberg / Sa. ( Location )
Reconnaissance Battalion AB-7 Ludvík Svoboda Dresden ( location )
NB-7 News Battalion Egon Dreger Dresden ( location )
Pionierbataillon PiB-7 Arthur Thiermann[42] Pirna ( location )
BChA-7 Chemical Defense Battalion Johannes Eggert Pirna ( location )
Battalion Material Seizure BMS-7 Kurt Schlosser Dresden ( location )
Medical Battalion SanB-7 Dresden ( location )
Instandsetzungsbataillon IB-7 Gustav Schneider Spremberg ( location )

Information on the origin and development of the units / units of the 7th PD

The division, structure, equipment with technology and armament of the troops and units as well as the occupancy of the 7th Panzer Division were subject to multiple changes and additions. The following tables refer to the origin of the formations from the CIP and the development of the structural elements and locations in the 7th PD.

Table: Information on the origin, location and structure of the troops / units of the 7th Panzer Division (NVA)
KVP
command, unit, facilities
NVA
for years
NVA
location
and changes
NVA
troop unit, unit, facility
[name, location]
Troop flag
awarded on
Honorary name since
Readiness Dresden / leadership, staff 1956 Dresden
  • 1963 to within Dresden
7th Panzer Division / leadership, staff ( location ) 20.08.1956
C-Kommando Spremberg (heavy tank and SPG command) 1956 Spremberg PR-14 Panzer Regiment ( Lage ) 01.12.1956 Karol Świerczewski 02.04.1963
C-Kommando Spremberg (tank command) 1956 Spremberg
  • 1958 to Cottbus
PR-15 Panzer Regiment ( Lage ) 01.12.1956 Paul Hornick 07.10.1971
A-command Löbau (mechanized command) 1956 Löbau PR-16 Panzer Regiment ( Lage ) 01.03.1959 Leo Jogiches 07.10.1969
A command Bärenstein / Marienberg, Frankenberg / Sa. (Mech. Kdo.) 1956
  • Marienberg
  • 1961 III. MSB to Frankenberg / Sa.
  • 1972 III. MSB to Marienberg
Motorized Rifle Regiment MSR-7 ( location ) 05.10.1957 Max Roscher 07.10.1969
C-training department Spremberg (tank training department) 1956 Spremberg Lehrbataillon LB-7
  • 1958 dissolved 1958 ( location )
B Command Zittau (Artillery Command) 1956 Zittau
  • 1963 to Frankenberg / Sa.
Artillery Regiment AR-7 ( location ) 07.10.1958 Albert Hößler 01.03.1974
S-5 Department Zittau (Flak Command) 1956 Zittau
  • 1963 to Döbeln
  • 1982 to Zeithain
Flak Regt. FR-7
  • 1979 anti-aircraft missile rain. FRR-7 ( layer )
06.01.1958 Paul Rockstroh[43] 01.03.1976
1963
  • Hermsdorf
    • 1965 an 11. MSD
    • 1965 by 11th MSD
  • 1967 to Zeithain
independent artillery division sAA-7
  • 1965 renamed sAA-11
  • 1965 renamed sAA-7
  • 1967 reformed to the missile division RA-7 (Lage)

( Location )

01.03.1964 Alfred Kurella 07.10.1986
1973 Frankenberg / Sa. Shotgun Department GeWA-7 ( Location ) 07.10.1973 Ernst Schneller 07.10.1987
Motorcycle department Frankenberg / Sa. 1956
1961
1963
1966
Frankenberg / Sa.
  • 1961 to Marienberg
  • 1963 to Dresden
Reconnaissance Battalion AB-7
  • 1961 Reconnaissance company AklK-7
  • 1965 rise to AB-7 ( location )
07.10.1967 Ludvík Svoboda 01.03.1986
D-1 department Dresden (news department) 1956 Dresden
  • 1963 within Dresden
NB-7 News Battalion ( Lage ) 07.10.1959 Egon Dreger 01.03.1987
D-2 department Dresden (pioneer department) 1956 Dresden
  • 1956 to Pirna
Pionierbataillon PiB-7 ( Lage ) 07.10.1959 Arthur Thiermann[44] 01.03.1987
Protection company Dresden 1956 Dresden
  • 1961 Pirna
Chemical company ChKp-7
  • 1964 Chemical Defense Company KChA-7
  • 1968 Battalion Chemical Defense BChA-7 ( location )
07.10.1967 Johannes Eggert 01.03.1988
Motor vehicle company Dresden 1956 Dresden Transport company TrpK-7
  • 1961 Transportbataillon TB-7
  • 1980 reorganized battalion material security BMS-7 ( location )
07.10.1959 Kurt Schlosser 07.10.1987
Ready camp Dresden 1956 Dresden Divisionslager DL-7
  • 1980 transformed into the BMS-11 material security battalion ( location )
1961 Dresden Bakery train BäZ-7
  • Feldbäckerei-Kompanie FBäK-7
  • 1980 transformed into the BMS-7 material security battalion ( location )
Medical department Dresden 1956 Dresden Divisions-Med.-Punkt DMP-7

1961 Medical battalion SanB-7 1989 Medical company Sank-7 (location) Dresden ( location )

B-Workshop Dresden (Artillery Workshop) 1956 Dresden
  • 1956 to Spremberg
Artilleriewerkstatt ArtlW-7
  • 1971 transformed into the repair battalion IB-11 ( Lage )
Car workshop Dresden 1956 Dresden
  • 1956 to Spremberg
Kfz.-Werkstatt-7 KfzW-7
  • 1971 transformed into the repair battalion IB-11 ( Lage )
Spremberg tank workshop 1956 Spremberg Tank workshop PzW-7
  • 1971 transformed into the repair battalion IB-11 ( Lage )
1971 Spremberg Repair Battalion IB-7 ( Location ) 07.10.1971 Gustav Schneider 07.10.1976
Commanders Company Dresden 1956 Dresden
  • within Dresden
Stabskompanie SK-7 ( Lage )
Management company Dresden 1956 Dresden Command battery / chief rocket launch / art. FüBttr / CRA-7 ( location )
1960 Dresden Air Defense Staff Staff-TLA-7
  • 1968 Command battery / Chief Air Defense Force FüBttr / CTLA-7 ( location )

equipment

Information on the main types of technology and armament in the 7th PD

T-55 tanks of the NVA

At the time of the formation of the division, the armament and equipment of the units / units did not correspond to the number or type of the stipulations of the structural planning. The division was equipped with T-34 battle tanks when it was deployed .

In April 1957, the supply of brand new T-54 tanks began . By mid-July 1957, the PR medium tank battalions were equipped with T-54 tanks and the MSR-7 tank battalion with T-34/85 tanks. For the heavy tank battalions, only the PR-14 was equipped with the IS II tank. The heavy tank battalions of the PR-15 and PR-16 were replaced by the T 34/85 tank in 1959. The 7th Panzer Division had only reached its full level of equipment in 1964. [45] During the 1960s, T-55s and T-72M and T-72M1 main battle tanks were received in the 1980s .

When they were set up, the division's motorized rifle troops were equipped with SPW-40 and SPW-152 armored personnel carriers . In the mid-1960s, the SPW-60 armored personnel carriers and, from 1978, the SPW-70 and BMP-1 armored personnel carriers .

The units of the artillery and the air defense were accelerated from 1957 with combat technology, but partly filled with replacement technology. This process was continued with the increase in the firepower and mobility of the artillery by upgrading to the SFL howitzers 122 mm "Gwosdika" and 155 mm "Akazija". In 1987 the RA-7 received the "Totschka" missile complex.

In the mid-1980s, with the beginning of the introduction of the first generation of the coalition-compatible Automated Field Management System (AFFS) [46] into the NVA, the 7th Panzer Division (Dresden) was entrusted with its troop trials in the land forces. For this purpose, the automation specialist group of Section II (Land Forces) of the "Friedrich Engels" military academy was involved in training the management bodies of the 7th PD. The entire technology complex was handed over to the Soviet armed forces in June 1990 before the 7th PD was dissolved. [15]

Information on the handover of technology and armament (September 1990)

Main types of tank technology and vehicle technology in the 7th Panzer Division (NVA)
inventory [type, number] on September 5, 1990
Main species [type] 7. PD StK-7 PR-14 PR-15 Abas-6 MSR-7 AR-7 GeWA-7 FB-CRA-7 FFR-7 AB-7 NB-7 PiB-7
Pz. T-72 M 223 94 73 25 31
Pz. T-55 A 40 5 28 3 4
SPz 192 33 34 30 95
SPW 192 12 36 35 40 51 14 7 2 10 10 10 26
Vehicle 4553 158 423 440 481 614 413 125 38 306 93 133 304
Main types of artillery armament in the 7th Panzer Division (NVA)
inventory [type, number] on September 5, 1990
Main species [type] 7. PD PR-14 PR-15 Abas-6 MSR-7 AR-7 GeWA-7 RA-7 FFR-7 AB-7 NB-7 PiB-7
Artillery armament
Cannon-85 4 4
Hood. D-30 4 4
GW-RM70 18 18
SFL-H-122 72 18 54
SFL-H-152 18 18
GW-43-120 26 8 18
PALR-Ed. 14 5 9

literature

  • Author collective: The Leipzig Military District. 1956-1990. Brief history. (Ed.) Association for the development of the Military History Museum Anhalt e. V., Dessau-Rosslau 2016, 136 pp.
  • Guntram König: The great book of the National People's Army. History, tasks, equipment. Das Neue Berlin, Berlin 2008, ISBN 978-3-360-01954-7 .
  • Wilfried Copenhagen : The land forces of the NVA. Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 2003, ISBN 3-613-02297-4 ( Motorbuch-Verlag special ).
  • Klaus Naumann (Ed.): NVA. Demand and Reality. According to selected documents. 2nd Edition. Mittler, Hamburg et al. 1996, ISBN 3-8132-0430-8 ( open words ).
  • Jörg Siegert : Type compass tanks of the NVA. 1956-1990. Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 978-3-613-02954-5 ( type compass. Basic knowledge for tank fans ).
  • Walter J. Spielberger, Jörg Siegert, Helmut Hanske: The battle tanks of the NVA. Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 2008, ISBN 3-613-01759-8 ( military vehicles 16).
  • Location database of the National People's Army of the GDR. Ministry for National Defense of the GDR (MfNV), Military History Research Office MGFA.

Weblinks

Individual evidence

  1. a b State of defense level
  2. See location database. Location database of the National People's Army of the GDR - abbreviation 7th PD. Ministry for National Defense of the GDR (MfNV), Military History Research Office MGFA, accessed on September 21, 2020 .
  3. With order 500/50 from the head of the main training administration (C-HVA), Inspector General Heinz Hofmann, to reorganize the people's police station and schools established up to that point, the determined establishment of the barracked people's police (KVP) was initiated.
  4. The order 500/50 from the head of the HVA, General Inspector Heinz Hofmann, to reorganize the VP readiness and schools that had been formed up to that point meant major changes for the Dresden Territorial Administration (TV). B. the outsourcing of units of readiness Gera and Meiningen to Bärenstein (Altenberg) and Marienberg as well as numerous relocations within the TV. Colonel Werner Pilz was entrusted with the management of the Mech. Readiness Dresden of the KVP from September 1953.
  5. Torsten Diedrich, Rüdiger Wenzke: The camouflaged army - history of the barracked people's police 1952-1956. Berlin 2001, p. 453 f.
  6. Timeline for the year 1956. In: Author collective: Timeline for the military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949–1988. Berlin 1986, ISBN 3-327-00720-9 , pp. 56-74
  7. ^ Application of the GDR delegation to integrate the armed contingents of the NVA into the United Armed Forces and resolution of the Political Advisory Committee of the States participating in the Warsaw Treaty 27. – 28. January 1956 in Prague. In: Author collective: Timeline of the military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949–1988. Berlin 1986, ISBN 3-327-00720-9 , p. 57.
  8. The genus Mechanized Troops (in the Soviet Union of the 1930s / 1950s), ru - механизированные войска [Mechanisirowannyje Wojska] comprised motorized, motorized rifle, tank, artillery, anti-aircraft artillery formations. (Source in: Military Encyclopedia Dictionary. Ru - Военный Энциклопедический Словарь [Wojenny Enziklopeditscheskij Slowar]). Moscow 1986, p. 441.
  9. See: About the main administration training (HVA) and the Kasernierte Volkspolizei (KVP) to the regular armed forces of the German Democratic Republic. In: Gerold Möller (Ed.): 11th Motorized Rifle Division. Halle, Bad Frankenhausen, Hermsdorf, Sondershausen, Weißenfels, Wolfen, Zeithain. History and tradition, development and documentation. 3rd, revised and supplemented edition, Halle 2005, pp. 6-7.
  10. Order 1/56 of the Minister of National Defense of February 10, 1956 on the “Formation of the National People's Army, the Ministry of National Defense and the Introduction of the Uniforms of the National People's Army” on March 1, 1956.
  11. ^ Author collective: Timeline of the military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949–1988. Berlin 1986, ISBN 3-327-00720-9 , p. 57.
  12. The area of ​​responsibility of Military District III extended to the GDR districts of Cottbus, Halle, Leipzig, Dresden, Karl-Marx-Stadt, Erfurt, Gera and Suhl. In addition, the command of the military district was already structurally divided into the field command of the 3rd Army and the territorial military district III in peacetime. (Source: Federal Archives. Command MB III. [1] ; accessed October 20, 2020.)
  13. ^ A b Wilfried Copenhagen: The land forces of the NVA. Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 2003, ISBN 3-613-02297-4 , pp. 40-41.
  14. ^ With order No. 54/56 from the Minister for National Defense, Colonel General Willy Stoph, the 7th PD was put into service and sworn in on August 20, 1956 in the Nochten military camp. Colonel Heinrich Brandes (previously head of the Grossenhain tank school) took over the troop flag of the 7th PD.
  15. a b c d e f g h Source: According to information from an interview on September 24, 2020 with Colonel a. D. Volker Bednara, K-7. PD (1987-1990). The database (from September 5, 1990) is fed from the submitted attachments of the non-classified handover protocol of the 7th PD of October 5, 1990 (copy is available).
  16. ^ The law supplementing the constitution (1949) was passed on September 26, 1955 by the People's Chamber of the GDR. Article 5 declares the "service for the protection of the fatherland and the socialist achievements of the working people to be an honorable national duty of the citizens of the GDR [...] and according to Article 112 the republic is responsible for legislation on the military protection of the homeland and the protection of citizens. “Quoted from Zeittafel 1955. In: Author collective: Zeittafel zur military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949 to 1988. 2nd, expanded and revised edition, Berlin 1989, pp. 54–55.
  17. Article 7 of the Constitution of the GDR (1968): documentarchiv.de“(1) The state organs guarantee the territorial integrity of the German Democratic Republic and the inviolability of its state borders, including its air space and territorial waters, as well as the protection and use of its continental shelf. (2) The German Democratic Republic organizes national defense as well as the protection of the socialist order and the peaceful life of the citizens. The National People's Army and the other organs of national defense protect the socialist achievements of the people against all external attacks. The National People's Army maintains close brotherhood in arms with the armies of the Soviet Union and other socialist states in the interests of peace and the security of the socialist state. "
  18. ^ National People's Army of the GDR (NVA). In: Author collective: Dictionary on German military history. Wed-Z. 2nd, revised edition, volume 2. Berlin 1987, ISBN 3-327-00478-1 , p. 677.
  19. See Sebald Daum: The combat training in the military district. In: Author collective: The Leipzig military district. 1956-1990. Brief history. (Ed.) Association for the development of the Military History Museum Anhalt e. V., Dessau-Rosslau 2016, pp. 19–23.
  20. The training stages in the land forces of the NVA are described in: Gerold Möller (Ed.): 11th Motorized Rifle Division Halle, Bad Frankenhausen, Hermsdorf, Sondershausen, Weißenfels, Wolfen, Zeithain. History and tradition, development and documentation. 3rd, revised and supplemented edition, Halle 2005, pp. 111–115.
  21. Participation of the NVA in exercises and maneuvers in the coalition stock. In: Author collective: Timeline of the military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949–1988. Berlin 1986, ISBN 3-327-00720-9 , 660 pp.
  22. Zeittafel 1966. In: Author collective: Zeittafel for the military history of the German Democratic Republic 1949 to 1988. 2nd, expanded and revised edition, Berlin 1989, pp. 220–222.
  23. ^ Rüdiger Wenzke: The NVA and the Prague Spring 1968. The role of Ulbricht and the GDR armed forces in the suppression of the Czechoslovak reform movement. 1st edition, Berlin 1995, p. 36. (Research on GDR history, volume 5).
  24. ^ Rüdiger Wenzke: The NVA and the Prague Spring 1968. The role of Ulbricht and the GDR armed forces in the suppression of the Czechoslovak reform movement. 1st edition, Berlin 1995, pp. 83-86. (Research on GDR history, Volume 5).
  25. ^ Rüdiger Wenzke: The NVA and the Prague Spring 1968. The role of Ulbricht and the GDR armed forces in the suppression of the Czechoslovak reform movement. 1st edition, Berlin 1995, pp. 98-114. (Research on GDR history, Volume 5).
  26. ^ Rüdiger Wenzke: The NVA and the Prague Spring 1968. The role of Ulbricht and the GDR armed forces in the suppression of the Czechoslovak reform movement. 1st edition, Berlin 1995, pp. 136-138. (Research on GDR history, Volume 5).
  27. ^ Rüdiger Wenzke: The NVA and the Prague Spring 1968. The role of Ulbricht and the GDR armed forces in the suppression of the Czechoslovak reform movement. 1st edition, Berlin 1995, pp. 198-199. (Research on GDR history, Volume 5).
  28. Press release The disarmament process should continue without a break. In: Neues Deutschland, edition January 24, 1989, p. 1. Online source [2]
  29. Two tank battalions (T-72) from the PR-16 were disbanded, 32 T-72 tanks were handed over to the PR-15, thus completing the conversion of the 7th PD (NVA) to the T-72 tank. Another PB of the PR-16 was given to the training base Abas-6 of the 7th PD as a training battalion. Source: According to information from an interview on September 24, 2020 with Colonel a. D. Volker Bednara, K-7. PD (1987-1990). The database (from September 5, 1990) is fed from the submitted attachments of the unclassified handover protocol of the 7th PD of October 5, 1990 (copy is available).
  30. The training base (Abas-6) in Großenhain was first presented in March 1989 in a teaching demonstration by the NVA's land forces.
  31. Non-structural hundreds were kept ready in Dresden, Großenhain, Pirna, Frankenberg / Sa. According to investigation reports, there was only one confrontation with demonstrators during the entire period when police were assisted in the arrest of 4 to 5 people who overturned a police car on October 6, 1989.
  32. Ensuring security in the military objects included the safe storage of around 760 armored vehicles, 140 tubes of heavy artillery, 120 anti-aircraft weapons, 4,600 vehicles, almost 17,000 rifles and more than 3,600 tons of combat ammunition. (Source: The database of September 5, 1990 is fed from the submitted attachments of the unclassified handover protocol of the 7th PD of October 5, 1990 - a copy is available).
  33. ^ Minister for Disarmament and Defense: Order No. 48/90 of September 21, 1990. Tasks of the National People's Army in connection with the formation of all-German armed forces. Ed .: Federal Archives / Military Archives. Ext. 1/44497. In: A. Preliminary remarks, I. Introduction, SV php.isn.ethz.ch (PDF in the Parallel History Project ).
  34. In the NVA land forces, accompanied by NVA officers, several reconnaissance groups (with four to five participants) of the army of the Bundeswehr visited from March 3rd to 8th. September 1990 the NVA properties, received property location plans and information reports. (Source: Order 13/90 of the Chief of Land Forces, August 1990)
  35. ↑ In preparation for the handover of official business, the commanders of the troop units and their equals had to draw up handover / takeover protocols based on service regulation 010/0/003, Appendix 5. (Source: Order No. 48/90 of the Minister for Disarmament and Defense on the tasks of the NVA in connection with the formation of all-German armed forces of September 21, 1990.)
  36. The commanders of the troops and equals had to make the necessary stipulations for the assumption of the provisional ranks of the Bundeswehr for the members of the NVA in an order about personnel decisions. (Source: Order No. 48/90 of the Minister for Disarmament and Defense on the tasks of the NVA in connection with the formation of all-German armed forces of September 21, 1990.)
  37. The authors. In: Werner Krätschell (Hrsg.): What was and what remains: Fireside chats of former leading German military from East and West. 2nd edition, MGFA, Potsdam 2008, ISBN 978-3-9808882-9-5 , p. 152.
  38. From 1995 moved to Frankenberg as Panzer Grenadier Brigade 37 . Renamed in 1996 to Jägerbrigade 37 . Further changes in the following years.
  39. The training base (Abas-6) in Großenhain was first presented in March 1989 in a teaching demonstration by the NVA's land forces.
  40. Overview of the most important troops or units of the 7th Panzer Division and their development. [3]
  41. Paul Rockstroh. In: [4]
  42. Arthur Thiermann. In: [5]
  43. Paul Rockstroh. In: [6]
  44. Arthur Thiermann. In: [7]
  45. Wilfried Copenhagen: The land forces of the NVA. Motorbuch-Verlag, Stuttgart 2003, ISBN 3-613-02297-4 , p. 33.
  46. AFFS Automated Field Management System (ru. - ПАЗУВ Полевая автоматизированная Система управления войск [PASUV Polewaja Awtomatisirowannaja Sistema Uprawlija). See: Experience report by Gerhard Weise and Günter Wolf on the introduction of the AFFS from 1985 in the 7th Panzer Division. In: online source [8]