A7V-U - A7V-U

Assault armored car A7V-U
Complete prototype (1918)

Complete prototype (1918)

General properties
crew 16
Long 8,38 m
width 3,06 m
height 3,35 m
Mass 39,8 t
Armor and armament
Armor 14 mm
Main armament 2 cannons 5.7 cm
Secondary armament 4 light MG 08/15
agility
drive two four-cylinder in-line engines from Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft
147 kW (200 PS )
Top speed 16 km / h (road)
4–8 km / h (off-road)
Power / weight 3.7 kW / t (5.0 PS / t)

The Sturmpanzerwagen A7V-U is a German tank development from the First World War , a further development of the A7V . Whose name was inspired by the office of A EPARTMENT 7 V erkehrswesen . [1]

description

A7V-U before assembling the side core and tower

The A7V-U is a tank developed in 1917 with a circumferential chain guide, the long sides of which had an approximate rhombus shape, as was known from the British tanks. Especially booty models of the Mark I.were the role models. In order to ensure quick, efficient assembly and the provision of spare parts, the A7V-U was designed to ensure that the parts between this model and the regular A7V are largely interchangeable. Therefore, both versions corresponded in the arrangement of the motor, the technical equipment and the load-bearing parts of the chain drive. An important main difference lay in the fixed connection between armor and chassis, which made it impossible to replace the entire body without problems, as with the A7V, and in the crawler tracks. The A7V-U had a fixed turret for machine gunsmen, the driver and the commander did not sit above the engines as in the A7V, but had their place in the front of the tub. As with the regular A7V, a 16-man crew was planned.Machine guns 08/15 . [2] It was planned to February 1919, first delivery of 60 tanks of this type, which should amount to a total of 240 vehicles by June 1919th [3] An advantage of the German design was the larger side swivel range of the on-board cannons, in contrast to the British, which were located in two laterally attached gun cores. Nevertheless, the swivel range was limited to 110 degrees. Since the dangers of the blind spots in front of the armored car had been recognized, an attempt was made in the A7V-U to limit these areas to a minimum by means of numerous loopholes for machine guns and small arms. [2]

Test results and rejection

The traffic engineering examination commission (VPK) reported the first A7V-U on May 5, 1917, ready for the march on September 1, 1917. But this appointment could not be kept. Technical difficulties and problems with the procurement of materials delayed the production of the prototype. Therefore, the first driving tests could only be made on June 25, 1918. It quickly became apparent that the 40-ton vehicle was too heavy and had a poor center of gravity. Despite its bulk, the planned crew in the A7V-U had significantly less space available than in the A7V. The shooters had to fire deep seated or kneeling. Nevertheless, the OIc section wanted to see the A7V-U at the front as soon as possible. In particular the demonstration of a captured Mark IVon December 19, 1917 made a great impression. [2]

The A7V-U project was criticized by key decision-makers from the start. The chief engineer Joseph Vollmer (1871–1955), the designer of the A7V, who was also responsible for the A7V-U, disliked the fact that with the chains completely unsecured against fire, an important weak point in the Allied tank models should now also be imitated by the German side . Like Vollmer, the A7V department did not endorse the construction of the A7V-U. On the other hand, the OIc section of the OI department of the Supreme Army Command (OHL) and, until mid-March 1918, the head of field force driving, were behind the project. [2]

The production of the A7V-U, of which a single built prototype had been assembled by Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft , was finally in June 1918 in favor of the Protze developed by Kruppdeferred. In addition to the difficulties mentioned, comparative tensile tests with a regular A7V formed an important criterion against the A7V-U. On the A7V-U, there was 40 percent greater friction in the chain circulation than the standard model. In addition, the upper part of the chain guide silted up quickly. This was a technical error that also showed up in the British model of the A7V-U. Therefore, the development of the A7V-U was finally given up on September 12, 1918. The prototype was transferred to the Berlin-based tank driving school of the Guard Motor Vehicle Battalion [3] and ultimately scrapped.

A7V-U side view

Technical specifications

The technical data of the A7V-U prototype corresponded in many areas to those of the "normal" A7V . [4]

Manufacturer Daimler Motor Company
crew 16 Mann
Motor Double engine system, Daimler-Benz 165 204 , 4-cylinder in-line engines (water-cooled) with cylinders cast together in pairs, two overhead valves per cylinder, under-controlled, double centrifugal cooling water pump
Bore, stroke 165/200 mm
Displacement i 17,000 cm³
power 100 HP (74 kW) each at 800 to 900 rpm
Carburetor Pallas carburetor, rev limiter
ignition High voltage magneto ignition ( electric arc )
lubrication Pressure circulation lubrication
cooler Tube cooler
Fuel Gasoline - benzene mixture
speed 16 km / h (road) / 4–8 km / h (off-road)
Length Width Height 8,38 m / 4,89 m / 3,14 m
Ability to exceed 3–4 m
total weight 40 t
Armament 2 Cockerill-Nordenfelt-Casematt-Schnellfeuerkonone 5.7 cm L / 26.3
4 lMG 08/15

literature

  • Wolfgang Schneider and Rainer Strasheim: Waffen-Arsenal Volume 112 German combat vehicles in World War I , Podzun - Pallas Verlag GmbH 1988, ISBN 3-7909-0337-X .
  • Heinrich Walle (Red.), Committee for the replica of the Sturmpanzerwagen A7V (publisher): Sturmpanzerwagen A7V. From the original tank to the Leopard 2. A contribution to the history of the military and technology (= military technology and scientific weapons science 15). Mittler, Herford 1990, ISBN 3-8132-0351-4 .
  • Roger Ford: Panzer from 1916 to today , Karl Müller Verlag 1997, ISBN 3-86070-676-4 .

Weblinks

Commons : A7V-U - Collection of images, videos and audio files

Remarks

  1. ^ Fritz Hahn: Weapons and Secret Weapons of the German Army 1933-1945. Bernard & Graefe Verlag, Bonn 1987, ISBN 3-7637-5832-1 . P. 17.
  2. a b c d Heinz Kaufhold-Roll: The emergence of the heavy combat vehicle (A7V) . In: Heinrich Walle (Red.), Committee for replicating Sturmpanzerwagen A7V (Ed.): Sturmpanzerwagen A7V. From the original tank to the Leopard 2. A contribution to the history of the military and technology (= military technology and scientific weapons science 15). Mittler, Herford 1990, ISBN 3-8132-0351-4 . Pp. 51-79; here: p. 72.
  3. a b Heinz Kaufhold-Roll: The emergence of the heavy combat vehicle (A7V) . In: Heinrich Walle (Red.), Committee for replicating Sturmpanzerwagen A7V (Ed.): Sturmpanzerwagen A7V. From the original tank to the Leopard 2. A contribution to the history of the military and technology (= military technology and scientific weapons science 15). Mittler, Herford 1990, ISBN 3-8132-0351-4 . Pp. 51-79; here: p. 73.
  4. Heinz Kaufhold-Roll: The emergence of the heavy combat vehicle (A7V) . In: Heinrich Walle (Red.), Committee for replicating Sturmpanzerwagen A7V (Ed.): Sturmpanzerwagen A7V. From the original tank to the Leopard 2. A contribution to the history of the military and technology (= military technology and scientific weapons science 15). Mittler, Herford 1990, ISBN 3-8132-0351-4 . Pp. 51-79; here: p. 77.