Altpreußisches Infanterieregiment No. 11 (1806) - Altpreußisches Infanterieregiment No. 11 (1806)

Regiment on foot & name of owner

active 1685 to 1806> Grenadier Regiment No. 3
State Prussia
Armed forces Prussian Army
Branch of service Infantry
Insinuation I. Army Corps
Former locations Königsberg/Pr. 1765: Rastenburg, Angerburg, Nordenburg, Drengfurt
Origin of the soldiers East Prussia
owner Friedrich Ludwig von Holstein-Beck (1685), Friedrich Wilhelm von Holstein-Beck (1721), Lorenz Ludwig von Below (1749), Johann Karl von Rebentisch (1758), Hans von Tettenborn (1763), Jakob Rüdiger von Zastrow (1776) , Friedrich Alexander von Rothkirch (1782), Karl von Voss (1786)
Tribe list Altpreußische Infanterieregimenter
Stem number No. 11
Wars & major battles War of Austrian Succession , Seven Years War , Coalition Wars : Chotusitz (1742), Hohenfriedberg (1745), Thrush (1745, only grenadiers), Groß-Jägersdorf (1757), Zorndorf (1758), winged grenadiers in further battles
Flag of the 11th Infantry Regiment
Flag of the Grenadier Regiment No. 3

The later grenadier regiment "King Friedrich Wilhelm I." (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 was one of the oldest regiments in Prussia. As a "regiment on foot" founded in 1685, it was part of the old Prussian infantry regiments that grew rapidly in the period that followed . After the devastating defeat of Jena and Auerstedt , the Prussian army was practically reorganized by Scharnhorst . He found Infantry Regiment No. 11 in the reserve corps of L'Estocq was largely intact after the battle of Preussisch Eylau and divided it with remnants of infantry regiment No. 51 in the new Prussian Armyone. Together with the 1st Guards Regiment on foot , the "Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I. No. 3" and six other grenadier regiments formed the "old Prussian regiments" in the new Prussian army. In their garrison in Königsberg , the soldiers were simply called the "Third Grenadiers" or the "Third Regiment".

history

In its 234-year history, the regiment served under a Brandenburg elector and nine different Prussian kings. In addition, from 1655 to 1713 it was “rented” several times to foreign rulers (including the governor of the Netherlands William III of Orange) for foreign conflicts for subsidy payments .

Reign of the Great Elector (until 1688)

On August 18, 1685 (Foundation Day), the regiment was founded under the name “Jung-Holstein” by the Great Elector in the Wesel Citadel . At first they were armed with hand grenades , rapiers , muskets and pikes .

In the Palatinate War of Succession , the regiment in Holland was placed under the command of William of Orange , successfully defended the Charleroi fortress and fought on the Rhine under General Barfus in Uerdingen in 1689.

Reign of King Friedrich I (1688–1713)

In 1693 the regiment was part of the imperial troops in the Great Turkish War and fought in Serbia and Hungary. The commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel von Horn, fell in Belgrade . Under Prince Eugene it fought in Hungary in the Battle of Zenta .

In 1698 the regiment's garrison was relocated from Wesel to Königsberg , which was to become the headquarters until 1765. One third of the regiment's recruits came from Königsberg, Angerapp and Drengfurth and the other two thirds from the offices of the eastern Samland around Labiau-Tapiau up to the Tilsit-Insterburg line.

In order to gain royal dignity, Frederick I had undertaken to take part in the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) with several thousand soldiers. Under the command of Prince Leopold von Dessau as part of the Imperial Army, the regiment took part in battles in Italy near Saffano and the siege of Turin .

Reign of King Friedrich Wilhelm I (1713–1740)

From October to December 1715, the regiment successfully participated as part of the Prussian invasion army under the leadership of King Friedrich Wilhelm I in the siege of Stralsund and the conquest of the island of Rügen in the Great Northern War . The regiment was named after the soldier king.

Reign of King Friedrich II (1740–1786)

In the Silesian Wars (1740–1763) it fought in 1742 in the Battle of Chotusitz in Bohemia. Then in 1744 in the Battle of Hohenfriedberg and in the Battle of Thrush . In 1757 it took part in the battle of Groß-Jägersdorf against the Russians. A few months later regiment soldiers captured the Peenemünder Schanze from the Swedes. In the battle of Zorndorf on August 25, 1758, the number of crews was halved (726 dead, wounded and prisoners). On August 12, 1759, the participating grenadier company suffered in the battle of Kunersdorfwith 263 dead, wounded and prisoners also high losses. On November 20, 1759, the entire regiment surrendered at Maxen . In 1760 it was rebuilt and took part in the Battle of Torgau and in 1762 in the Battle of Freiberg .

Until the Wars of Liberation (1788–1815)

In 1794 the regiment took part as a Prussian contingent against the Kościuszko uprising in Poland and returned to Königsberg the following year. During the Fourth Coalition War , the regiment was stationed on the Vistula in 1806 and defended Danzig . In 1807 it distinguished itself in the battle of Prussian Eylau . On January 1, 1808, the regiment was reorganized. It now consisted of two grenadier companies, two musketeer battalions of four companies each, and one fusilier battalion.

In the Wars of Liberation (1813–1815) it fought under the leadership of Generals York and Blücher near Berlin, Wittenberg, Großgörschen , Bautzen , Löwenberg, Goldberg, Wartenburg , Leipzig , Metz, St. Dizier, Laon and Paris.

Until the unification of the empire (1815–1871)

During the German War of 1866, the regiment fought in Bohemia in the Battle of Trautenau and the Battle of Königgrätz . In the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–1871, the regiment was deployed in a wide variety of locations during the war. Among others at: Colombey , Noisseville and at Servigny, Amiens, Rouen, Evreux, Maison Brulet and St. Duen.

German Empire (1871-1914)

During the long peace years of the German Empire, the regiment was completely concentrated in Königsberg. A fourth battalion was also formed. On the first birthday of Emperor Wilhelm II , he gave the regiment its last name in the order of January 27, 1889:

“I want to give the 2nd East Prussian Grenadier Regiment No. 3 in recognition of the good service rendered to the King and the Fatherland during its 200-year existence, a special proof of My grace and goodwill by giving it the name

Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I.


give. I trust the regiment that it will always show itself worthy of the name of my lofty ancestor, well-deserved for the education of the Prussian army, and that it will be eager to strive after its high example through the most faithful fulfillment of duties. " [1]

In the Boxer Rebellion , the regiment sent two officers, seven NCOs and 67 crew soldiers to China as volunteers in 1900. In the uprising of the Herero and Nama , the regiment dispatched one officer, four non-commissioned officers, and 46 crew soldiers as volunteers.

Wilhelm II becomes head of the regiment

Kaiser Wilhelm II said goodbye to the officer corps on October 7, 1902
Imperial visit on October 6, 1910

On August 28, 1901, Wilhelm had all the cloths on the regimental flags replaced. On September 8th, a field service was held in the castle church to commemorate the 200-year elevation of Prussia to a kingdom. On the evening of that day the regiment was ordered into the courtyard of the palace at 9 a.m. on the following day. The emperor rode off the front and gave the following address:

“It is an important year in which we live, the year 1901. As was already remembered yesterday at the celebration in the church, where the regiment was represented by its flags, it is now 200 years that it has been to God Lord has liked to receive the royal crown for my house. I therefore want to enter into closer relations with my beautiful I Army Corps and the sons of my beautiful province of East Prussia and for this purpose, as your supreme warlord, I have chosen the regiment that bears the name of exalted ancestor, King Friedrich Wilhelm I, the name of Soldier king who stabilized his sovereignty like a rocher de bronze. The regiment should see me as its boss in the future, it should carry on the name Friedrich Wilhelm I, and I reserve the right to give the regiment the outward signs of belonging to myself. I expect that the regiment will prove itself worthy of the high distinction of being the regiment of its king. " [1]

The regiment commander, Colonel Gaddum, thanked the regiment and the regiment responded with a triple hurray. The orders referring to the chief declaration were:

"1. In the wish to give the I. Army Corps a special proof of my appreciation for my presence at this year's autumn maneuvers, I hereby declare myself chief of the Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 To commemorate the 200 years of existence of the Kingdom of Prussia, choose this regiment for it, which bears the name of my illustrious ancestor, the soldier king, and has been closely connected for a long time with the old coronation city and my loyal province of East Prussia. "

- Signed Wilhelm

"2. To my Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3: I want the Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 on this day, on which I am his boss I have declared that I have given yet another proof of My Royal Grace by bestowing on him: On the helmets: the eagle without a star, on the collars and sleeve flaps for the officers a gold embroidery of the kind that was used by the officers of the regiment was worn under the Great Kings, white braid for the men. I have firm confidence in the regiment that it will always prove itself worthy of this new distinction and that it will show the same loyalty and devotion to me, my house and the fatherland through all times, which accounts for the unfading fame of its more than 200 year history. Koenigsberg i. Pr. September 9, 1901 "

- Signed Wilhelm [1]

All soldiers received guard decorations like the grenadier regiment "Kronprinz" (1st East Prussian) No. 1 a year before , although the regiment was not counted as part of the guard: For the officers and NCOs, the guard eagle without a star for the helmet, collar - and sleeve flap embroidery ; the teams received white lace on the collar. However, the old designation remained: Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 . Every year the emperor visits the regiment in autumn (beginning of October) after his hunting trip in Rominten. After greeting the regiment with a speech, he lingers for a few hours in the circle of the officer corps.

The son of the monarch Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia was placed à la suite of the regiment on January 29, 1905 , after he had turned 18.

First World War (1914-1918)

When the First World War broke out on August 2, 1914, the regiment numbered around 76 officers and service doors, six doctors, three paymasters and three battalions of 1,100 NCOs and men each, as well as a machine-gun company with six machine guns, i.e. around 3,400 soldiers. It was intended as a regular crew for Fort Quednau .

Under its commander, Colonel von Wedel, the regiment fought in the east from the very first days of the war: Stallupönen , Gumbinnen , Tannenberg , Masurian Lakes , Suwałki , on Lake Hańcza , Bakałarzewo , Lodz , Łowicz .

In early 1915 it was used in the Carpathian Mountains . On April 9, 1915, under the leadership of Colonel General Felix Graf von Bothmer , it stormed the Zwinin . Then in Volyn : at the Zlota Lipa , the Bania, the Styr and the Dniester , Ubrodowice, on the bow , in September in the Rokitnosümpfen at Brest-Litovsk , Lisowo, Podgatje and again on Styr. There, on October 18, 1915, the 9th, 10th and 12th companies were cut off from the regiment and taken prisoner by the Russians.

Then from March 7, 1916, he was transferred to the Western Front and used in the Battle of Verdun . So in the Cailette forest, in the fumine ridge in the Fauxgrund, in the chill forest, Damloup position. On the Fumin Ridge, it took part in the conquest of Fort Souville.

Relocated to the Eastern Front again from August 1, 1916 and fought in the Carpathian Mountains near Kirlibaba, on Deal Ormului, near Cimboslawa-Wielka, Margurita, Jacobeny and in 1917 in Bukovina .

As a result of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk , it was again used from 2 December 1917 at the West: in Étain , in the Emperors in Hamel , Chalons-sur-Marne , in Reims , on the Vesle in Charleville, the Laffaux- Corner, Brimont, on the Suippes, Hunding and Maas positions. On October 25 and 26, 1918, the 2nd Battalion was completely destroyed together with the Fusilier Battalion. Only the 2nd and 4th Companies remained of the first battalion , about 250 men. The number of deaths could no longer be determined for the subsequent battles for the Hunding position.

For the detailed course of the war see: the 1st division , in which the regiment was also represented.

250th anniversary in Koenigsberg

Memorial stone of the regiment

On October 1, 1919, the regiment was disbanded after 234 years of existence as a result of the Compiègne armistice . In the grenadier barracks on Canzer-Allee, the last station of the regiment, a memorial stone was erected which, in addition to the years 1685 and 1918 and the regimental circle, also contained the words: "The past ... the future" as an epitaph.

On August 18, 1935, the regiment celebrated its 250th anniversary in Königsberg. Although the regiment no longer existed, the National Socialist regime was still conscious of tradition. The grenadier barracks, which the regiment had only moved into in 1914 (previously housed with two battalions in the northern bastions of the Wallring) ( 54 ° 43 ′ 55.8 ″ N , 20 ° 32 ′ 5 ″ E ) is still in military use today.

Regimentschefs

Musketeers of the regiment at the time of the Seven Years' War
Rank Name Date [2]
Generalfeldmarschall Friedrich Ludwig Duke of Holstein-Beck August 18, 1685 to August 18, 1721
Generalfeldmarschall Friedrich Wilhelm Duke of Holstein-Beck August 19, 1721 to November 11, 1749
Lieutenant General Lorenz Ludwig von Below 0 December 4, 1749 to September 11, 1758
Major general Johann Karl von Rebentisch September 12, 1758 to September 30, 1763
Lieutenant General Hans von Tettenborn 0 October 1, 1763 to June 29, 1776
Major general Jakob Rüdiger von Zastrow June 30, 1776 to March 30, 1782
Major general Friedrich Alexander von Rothkirch May 21, 1782 to October 20, 1785
Major general Karl von Voss 0 March 1, 1786 to December 25, 1790
Lieutenant General Carl Ludwig Duke of Holstein-Beck December 26, 1790 to February 28, 1798
Lieutenant General Ernst von Schöning 0 March 1, 1798 to March 7, 1807
General of the Infantry Heinrich of Prussia 0 March 8, 1807 to July 12, 1846
Generalfeldmarschall Albrecht of Austria-Teschen April 20, 1859 to February 18, 1895
Wilhelm II. 0 September 9, 1901 to November 28, 1918

Commanders

Rank Name Date [3]
Major/
Oberstleutnant
Eberhard Friedrich Wilhelm von Graevenitz 1767 to 1771
Major Johann Friedrich Ludwig von Wopersnow 1771
Gottlieb von Ruskowski
Ferdinand von Strachwitz March 20, 1799 to
Hans Karl Friedrich Franz von Below September 24, 1808 to
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Friedrich Wilhelm of Sjöholm March 28, 1811 to May 22, 1815 (in charge of the tour)
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Friedrich Wilhelm von der Groeben 0 January 5, 1816 to February 11, 1827
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
August von Sommerfeld February 12, 1827 to March 29, 1829 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Karl August von Esebeck March 30, 1829 to March 29, 1835
Oberst Carl Rolas du Rosey March 30, 1835 to January 4, 1836 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Carl Rolas du Rosey 0 January 5, 1836 to March 29, 1840
Lieutenant colonel Karl Trützschler von Falkenstein March 30 to September 9, 1840 (entrusted with the tour)
Oberst Karl Trützschler von Falkenstein September 10, 1840 to March 30, 1846
Oberst Karl von Fuchs March 31 to October 4, 1846 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Karl von Fuchs 0 October 5, 1846 to December 3, 1849
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Ludwig von Hoffmann 0 December 4, 1849 to August 7, 1854
Oberst Heinrich Maximilian von Buddenbrock 0 October 5, 1854 to May 29, 1857
Oberst Friedrich von Szymanowitz May 30, 1857 to June 22, 1858
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Otto von Lehwaldt June 26, 1858 to July 23, 1861
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Ewald Theodor von Scheffer July 24, 1861 to August 13, 1865
Lieutenant colonel Heinrich von Blumenthal August 14, 1865 to April 2, 1866 (in charge of the tour)
Lieutenant Colonel /
Colonel
Heinrich von Blumenthal 0 April 3, 1866 to July 13, 1870
Oberst Erhard von Legat July 14, 1870 to August 6, 1874
Lieutenant colonel Albert Seelemann 0 August 7 to September 14, 1874 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Albert Seelemann September 15, 1874 to December 10, 1880
Oberst Anton Hakewessel December 11, 1880 to January 17, 1881 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Anton Hakewessel January 18, 1881 to December 7, 1885
Oberst Wilhelm Meyer 0 December 8, 1885 to July 5, 1886
Oberst Theodor Caspar 0 July 6, 1886 to September 20, 1889
Oberst Friedrich von Pentz September 21, 1889 to October 17, 1891
Oberst Maximilian Sommer October 18, 1891 to January 26, 1893
Oberst Weddo from Glümer January 27, 1893 to June 15, 1896
Oberst Friedrich von dem Hagen June 16, 1896 to August 14, 1899
Oberst Max Gaddum August 15, 1899 to February 24, 1902
Oberst Arnold von Amelunxen February 25, 1902 to May 20, 1906
Oberst Adalbert von Falk May 21, 1906 to April 1, 1909
Oberst Hugo von Bonin 0 April 2, 1909 to April 21, 1912
Oberst Hasso von Wedel April 22, 1912 to September 10, 1914
Lieutenant colonel Torsten von Posadowsky-Wehner September 13 to October 7, 1914
Lieutenant colonel Johannes Fleischer 0 October 7, 1914 to February 28, 1915
Lieutenant colonel Heinrich von Bibra 0 March 1 to June 1, 1915
Lieutenant colonel Johannes Fretzdorff 0 June 2, 1915 to November 24, 1916
Major Ulrich Schmidt November 25, 1916 to June 1917
Lieutenant colonel Alexander of Johnston June 1917 to February 23, 1919
Lieutenant colonel Hugo van den Bergh February 24 to September 30, 1919

Regimentsname

  • 1685–1808 According to the respective boss
  • 1806 additionally with No. 11
  • 1808–1816 2nd East Prussian Infantry Regiment (Prince Heinrich)
  • 1816–1823 3rd Infantry Regiment (2nd East Prussian)
  • 1823–1860 3. Infanterie-Regiment
  • 1860–1889 2nd East Prussian Grenadier Regiment No. 3
  • 1889–1919 Grenadier Regiment "King Friedrich Wilhelm I." (2nd East Prussian) No. 3

The garrison

  • 1685 Wesel
  • 1698–1765 Königsberg
  • 1765–1772 Rastenburg, Angersburg, Nordenburg
  • 1772–1776 Königsberg
  • 1776–1781 Rastenburg, Angersburg, Nordenburg, Grenadiere Drengfurt
  • 1781–1817 Königsberg
  • 1817–1848 Stab, I. and II. Bat. in Königsberg, Füssilier-Bat. in Braunsberg 1819 and 1826, Staff II. and Füssilier-Bat. in Königsberg, I. Bat. in Memel
  • 1848–1866 Stab, I. and Füssilier-Bat. in Königsberg, II. Bat. in Pillau (1848–1858), Gumbinnen (1858–1860), Bartenstein (1860–1866)
  • 1866–1872 Stab, II. Bat. in Gumbinnen, I. Bat. in Bartenstein, II. Bat. in Gumbinnen
  • 1872–1880 Stab, Füssilier-Bat. in Königsberg, I. Bat. in Bartenstein, II. Bat. in Gumbinnen
  • 1880–1889 Stab, II. And Füssilier Bat. in Gumbinnen, I. Bat. in Insterburg
  • 1889–1893 Königsberg
  • 1893–1919 Stab, I. and II. Bat. in Königsberg, Füssilier-Bat. in Braunsberg

Regimentsfahnen

In 1901, Kaiser Wilhelm II had the cloths of all battalions renewed. The following order was sent to the regiment with the towels:

“To the Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3
I want to dedicate a special proof of my royal grace and my excellent service to the Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 To give recognition by renewing the cloths of his glorious flags. I do this with the unshakable confidence that the regiment will continue with the same faithful fulfillment of its duties as before.
Berlin, August 28, 1901 signed Wilhelm " [1]

Regimental flag with cloth (1901) of the 1st and 2nd Battalion

Flag awards

I. Bataillon

  • 1815

a. Flag tip with the Iron Cross b. Volume with the war memorial coin 1813/14 c. Brass ring around the blown flagpole with the inscription: "Möckern, October 16, 1813"

  • 1835 A secular banner with the inscription: "Erected 1685" for the 150th anniversary
  • 1866 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1866 for participation in this campaign
  • 1872 Ribbon of the Iron Cross for participation in the 1870/71 campaign
  • 1885 A secular ribbon on the flag ribbon awarded in 1835 with the inscription: "1885" for the 200th anniversary of the regiment
  • 1895 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1870/71 with a clasp, which contained the names of the battles that took place on the occasion of the 25th anniversary.
  • 1900 A Zentenar flag ribbon to commemorate the turn of the century with the inscription "18.8.1685 - 1.1.1900."

Flag in hand, the standard bearer of I. Bat fell on October 16 in the Battle of Möckern. Sergeant Pallasch storming the enemy batteries. The flagpole was smashed in two. Sergeant Sahme carried the flag until the end of the battle. Since then, a brass ring has adorned the flagpole with the inscription: "Möckern October 16, 1813". In 1863 this was replaced by a silver one by order of the king.

II. Bataillon

  • 1815 flag top with the iron cross, ribbon with the war memorial coin 1813/14
  • 1835 A secular banner with the inscription: "Erected 1685" for the 150th anniversary
  • 1866 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1866 for participation in this campaign in 1872

a. Ribbon of the Iron Cross for participation in the campaign in 1870/71 b. A silver ring around the blown flagpole with the inscription: "Roisseville, September 1st, 1870" c. A silver clasp with the same inscription, which summarizes the remains of the shot ribbon of the war memorial coin 1813/14 in a loop.

  • 1885 A secular ribbon on the flag ribbon awarded in 1835 with the inscription: "1885" for the 200th anniversary of the regiment
  • 1895 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1870/71 with a clasp, which contained the names of the battles that took place on the occasion of the 25th anniversary.
  • 1900 A Zentenar flag ribbon to commemorate the turn of the century with the inscription "18.8.1685 - 1.1.1900."

In the Battle of Roisseville on September 1, 1870, the flag was shot through in the middle. At the same time, the tassel of the ribbon of the war memorial from 1813/14 was shot down. The flagpole broke in two. The standard bearer Sergeant Rautenberg could bring the flag to safety despite a severe hip wound. Since then, a silver ring has adorned the flagpole with the inscription: "Roisseville September 1st, 1870"

In 1810 King Friedrich Wilhelm III. four new flags for the 1st and 2nd battalions; since it was customary when the regiment was established that each company carried a flag, so that the regiment had a total of eight flags:

“My dear Colonel v. Below!
I am sending you four new flags for the 2nd East Prussian Infantry Regiment with the order to have them handed over to the regiment during the usual festivities and to declare in my name how I expect that it will be done again when the protection of the fatherland should require, these flags will also be wielded against the enemy with masculine fearlessness and steadfastness and thereby the good reputation that it has so gloriously earned under your command in the last war will be preserved. I am your sympathetic King
Gez. Friedrich Wilhelm " [1]

Füsilier-Battalion

  • 1817 volume with the war memorial coin 1813/14
  • 1835 A secular banner with the inscription: "Erected 1685" for the 150th anniversary
  • 1866 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1866 for participation in this campaign
  • 1872 Ribbon of the Iron Cross for participation in the 1870/71 campaign
  • 1885 A secular ribbon on the flag ribbon awarded in 1835 with the inscription: "1885" for the 200th anniversary of the regiment
  • 1895 The ribbon of the campaign medal from 1870/71 with a clasp, which contained the names of the battles that took place on the occasion of the 25th anniversary.
  • 1900 A Zentenar flag ribbon to commemorate the turn of the century with the inscription "18.8.1685 - 1.1.1900."

The fusilier battalion only carried its own flag from 1814.

literature

  • Johannes Becker (Vol. 1), E. Pauly (Vol. 2): History of the 2nd East Prussian Grenadier Regiment No. 3. , ES Mittler & Sohn , Berlin 1885, 2 Vols.
  • Anton von Mach: History of the Royal Prussian Second Infantry - called the King's Regiment - from its foundation in 1677 to December 3, 1840. ES Mittler & Sohn 1843. ( digitized version )
  • Fritz Schillmann: Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I. (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 in the World War 1914-1918 (= memorial sheets of German regiments. Troops of the former Prussian contingent . No. 118 ). Stalling, Oldenburg iO / Berlin 1924. Available online: Württembergische Landesbibliothek
  • Ulrich von Saucken: Grenadier Regiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 from its establishment to the present 1685–1910. Brief description of the history of the regiment. ES Mittler & Sohn , Berlin 1910.
  • Günter Wegner: Germany's armies until 1918. Origin and development of the individual formations. Volume 1: The Guard and Grenadier Regiments 1-12 of the Prussian Army. Osnabrück 1980, Biblio-Verlag, ISBN 3-7648-1199-4 .

Weblinks

Individual evidence

  1. a b c d e Ulrich von Saucken: Grenadier Regmiment King Friedrich Wilhelm I (2nd East Prussian) No. 3 from its establishment to the present 1685-1910. Brief description of the history of the regiment. ES Mittler & Sohn. Berlin 1910.
  2. ^ Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The occupation of the active infantry regiments as well as Jäger and MG battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , p. 43 f.
  3. ^ Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The staffing of the active infantry regiments as well as the jäger and MG battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , p. 44 ff.