Infantry Regiment "Duke Karl von Mecklenburg-Strelitz" (6th East Prussian) No. 43 - Infanterie-Regiment „Herzog Karl von Mecklenburg-Strelitz“ (6. Ostpreußisches) Nr. 43

Infantry Regiment "Duke Karl von Mecklenburg-Strelitz" (6th East Prussian) No. 43

active May 5, 1860 to July 12, 1919
State Kingdom of Prussia
Armed forces Prussian Army
Branch of service Infantry
Insinuation I. Army Corps

The Infantry Regiment "Duke Charles of Mecklenburg-Strelitz" (6 Ostpreußisches) No. 43 was an infantry joined the Prussian army .

story

The association was set up on May 5, 1860 as part of the Roon Army Reform as the 3rd Combined Infantry Regiment from the Landwehr main battalion in Insterburg , Gumbinnen and Lötzen . From July 4, 1860, it was called the 6th East Prussian Infantry Regiment . After winning the war in 1866, the Königsberg regiment moved into a new garrison and was stationed here in the infantry barracks on Steindamm.

On January 27, 1889, Kaiser Wilhelm II ordered the association to be named in memory of the infantry general Karl zu Mecklenburg .

“I want to honor the memory of my exalted ancestors resting in God as well as those highly deserving men who stood by them with special distinction in war and peace and who have earned just claims to the grateful memory of the king and fatherland, and for everyone Keeping times alive that I will give their names to regiments and battalions of My glorious army. "

From this point on, the association was called Infantry Regiment "Duke Karl von Mecklenburg-Strelitz" (6th East Prussian) No. 43 .

German war

In the war against Austria in 1866, the regiment took part in the battles near Trautenau and Königgrätz .

Franco-German War

In 1870/71 the regiment was used during the Franco-Prussian War in the battles near Colombey , Noisseville and at the Hallue as well as in the siege of Metz .

First World War

The regiment made of the outbreak World War on August 2 mobile . As part of the 2nd Infantry Brigade of the 1st Division , it was initially used on the Eastern Front . The association fought in the battles near Gumbinnen , Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes . At the beginning of March it was relocated to the Western Front for four months , participated in the fighting for Verdun and then returned to the Eastern Front , now subordinate to the 1st Infantry Brigade . In December 1916 the regiment received a 2nd and 3rd MG -Company . After the armistice in the east, the association returned to the western front at the end of 1917 and was initially involved in trench warfare for Verdun. From March 21, 1918, it took part in the Great Battle of France and after the end of the German offensive, fighting on the Ancre , Avre and Somme followed. In mid-August the III. Battalion of the disbanded Infantry Regiment No. 376 and shortly afterwards its own MW-Company set up. During the fighting for Laffaux, the regiment was almost completely taken prisoner on September 14, 1918. On September 18, the reorganization began, with the 3rd, 5th and 10th companies being disbanded. After further losses and because of the poor substitute situation , the III. Battalion disbanded.

Whereabouts

The regiment was demobilized from December 7th to 15th, 1918 after the end of the First World War and disbanded on July 12th, 1919. [2]

Two free formations formed from demobilized parts . The 1st Volunteer Battalion with MG and MW platoons was set up on January 15, 1919. It was used by the 1st Division in the Eastern Border Guard . In July 1919 the 2nd Volunteer Battalion was set up in Rastenburg . Both formations merged into the Provisional Reichswehr in the Reichswehr-Schützen-Regiment 96.

The tradition in the Reichswehr was taken over by the 16th Company of the 1st (Prussian) Infantry Regiment in Königsberg by decree of the Chief of the Army Command, General of the Infantry Hans von Seeckt .

Regimentschef

Moriz from Lyncker

The first and only head of the regiment was from March 21, 1916 until the dissolution of Colonel General Moriz von Lyncker . [3]

Commanders

Rank Name Date [4]
Lieutenant colonel Ludwig von Schlabrendorff 0 May 8 to June 30, 1860 (entrusted with the tour)
Lieutenant Colonel / Colonel Ludwig von Schlabrendorff 0 July 1, 1860 to April 17, 1865
Oberst Heinrich von Tresckow April 18, 1865 to February 17, 1868
Oberst Constantine of Busse March 22, 1868 to October 11, 1872
Lieutenant Colonel / Colonel Gustav von Köppen October 12, 1872 to November 11, 1878
Oberst Wilhelm Gruener November 12, 1878 to May 4, 1883
Oberst Viktor von Baumann 0 May 5, 1883 to July 15, 1887
Oberst Hermann Kupfer July 16, 1887 to September 18, 1888
Oberst Friedrich Metzler September 19, 1888 to May 15, 1891
Oberst Karl von Goessel May 16, 1891 to April 17, 1895
Oberst Hugo of Zamory April 18, 1895 to May 23, 1898
Oberst Wilhelm Eben May 24, 1898 to October 15, 1901
Oberst Hans von Wrochem October 16, 1901 to April 21, 1905
Oberst Alfred von Sydow April 22, 1905 to February 20, 1909
Lieutenant colonel Friedrich von Gontard February 21 to April 19, 1909 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Friedrich von Gontard April 20, 1909 to September 30, 1912
Oberst Artur von Eisenhart-Rothe 0 October 1, 1912 to September 25, 1914
Lieutenant colonel Hans Böckler September 26 to November 26, 1914
Lieutenant colonel Georg Dorndorf November 27, 1914 to September 14, 1918
Major Julius von Langsdorff September 23 to November 6, 1918
Major Gustav Wottrich 0 November 7, 1918 to January 9, 1919
Lieutenant colonel Edgar Grun January 10 to May 1919

Military chapel

Albert Krantz was the regiment's highly respected conductor for decades .

Timpani

Gallery

Known members of the regiment

literature

  • Jürgen Kraus : Handbook of the associations and troops of the German army 1914-1918. Part VI: Infantry. Volume 1: Infantry Regiments. Publishing house Militaria. Vienna 2007. ISBN 978-3-902526-14-4 . Pp. 90-91.
  • Georg Dorndorf: The Infantry Regiment No. 43. According to the official war diaries and some records of war participants. Oldenburg i. O./Berlin 1923. Available online: Württembergische Landesbibliothek
  • Günter Wegner: The Guard and Grenadier Regiments 1–12 of the Prussian Army. Osnabrück 1980, ISBN 3-7648-1199-4 (Germany's armies until 1918. Origin and development of the individual formations, Volume 1).

Weblinks

Individual evidence

  1. ^ Military weekly paper . No. 9 of January 30, 1889. pp. 185-186.
  2. ^ Jürgen Kraus: Handbook of the units and troops of the German army 1914-1918. Part VI: Infantry. Volume 1: Infantry Regiments. Publishing house Militaria. Vienna 2007. ISBN 978-3-902526-14-4 . P. 90.
  3. Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The staffing of the active infantry regiments as well as the hunter and machine gun battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag. Osnabrück 1992. ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 . P. 144.
  4. Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The occupation of the active infantry regiments as well as Jäger and MG battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , pp. 144–145 .
  5. ↑ Lists of losses in Prussia: No. 12 and No. 1126.