Jäger Battalion "von Neumann" (1st Silesian) No. 5 - Jäger-Bataillon „von Neumann“ (1. Schlesisches) Nr. 5

KnoetelSchlesisches.jpg
Jäger battalion "von Neumann" (1st Silesian) No. 5 in parade formation at the celebration of its 100th anniversary on September 1, 1908

The rifle battalion "von Neumann" (1st Silesian) no. 5 was an infantry joined the Prussian army , which consisted 1808-1919.

History and formation

The association was formed on November 21, 1808 (Foundation Day) by the highest cabinet order with the name Silesian Rifle Battalion . It initially consisted of the four companies , whose teams consisted of eleven companies of the light infantry - "von Sell", "von Clausewitz", "Reichmeister", "von Rekowsky", "von Freiburg", "von Stenzel", "von Offeney" "," Von Polczinsky "," von Berswordt "," von Vaerst "," von Ingenheim "- recruited. These were units that had already distinguished themselves in the Fourth Coalition War, 1806/07. The battalion met on March 8, 1809 in Reichenbach in Silesia. On April 14, 1809, the major general Ludwig Yorck von Wartenburg appointed special inspector of these battalions.

After the Wars of Liberation, the association was named 1st Rifle Battalion (Silesian) from November 5, 1816 to April 12, 1821 . In the course of the division, the 1st Rifle Division (West Prussian) was formed from this with the 1st and 2nd companies . From March 10, 1823, the country team name was dropped and the association was managed under the common commander with the 2nd rifle department until 1832. On October 1, 1845, the name was changed to the 5th Jäger Department and with the establishment of a 3rd Company on November 21, 1848 to the 5th Jäger Battalion . In the course of the army expansion, it was transferred to 1st Silesian Jäger Battalion No. 5 on July 4, 1860renamed. The last change came into force on January 27, 1889, when Kaiser Wilhelm II. In memory of the infantry general August Wilhelm von Neumann-Cosel (1786–1865) joined the hunter battalion "von Neumann" (1st Silesian) Named No. 5 .

Garrison / locations

from to Location
1809 1812 Liegnitz
1812 1813 Brieg
1814 1815 Aachen
1816 1830 Breslau
1830 1849 Görlitz
1849 1850 Düsseldorf[1]
1887 1919 Hirschberg

Mission history

Wars of Liberation

The battalion fought against France and its allies during the Wars of Liberation . From 1813 onwards there were frequent fights between the Bohemian-Prussian army and French troops. So from October 16 to 19, 1813 at the Battle of the Nations near Leipzig and finally on June 18, 1815 at the Battle of Waterloo under Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher .

Polish uprising in Poznan Province

  • Battle at Xions
  • Battle of Miloslaw

Baden Revolution

On the occasion of the suppression of the Baden Revolution , the battalion moved to Baden . On June 21, 1849 it was used at Ladenburg . The 2nd Company was working at Heidelberg at the same time . The hunters were on June 29th at the Federbach , on June 30th at Steinmauern and on July 8th, 1849 at Niederbühl .

German war

9th Infantry Division , 5th Army Corps

Franco-German War

During the war against France in 1870/71 the battalion took part in the battles at Weißenburg , Wörth and Sedan and from September 19, 1870 to January 28, 1871 in the enclosure and siege of Paris .

First World War

In the course of mobilization, the battalion set up Reserve Jäger Battalion No. 5 and Reserve Jäger Battalion No. 21 at the beginning of August 1914 .

1914

  • 0 August 1st to 4th - mobilization
  • 0 August 4th to 7th - loading and driving to the west
  • 0 August 8-21 - crossing the French border, reconnaissance before the 5th Army
  • August 22nd to 30th - Battle of Longwy , fighting on the Othain sector, crossing over the Meuse in the Stenay area
  • August 31 to September 10 - fighting in the Argonnerwald / Varennes , crossing over the Rhine-Marne Canal
  • September 11 to 24 - general retreat, transition to trench warfare
  • from September 25th - trench warfare in the Argonne

1915

  • Trench warfare in the Argonne, fighting for the height of " la Fille Morte "

1916

  • until July 30th - trench warfare in the Argonne
  • 0 August 1st to 5th - Transport to the Eastern Front in Galicia
  • 0 August 9-22 - fights near Tezupol / Galicia
  • 23 to 24 August - transport to the Lutsk arch ( Brusilov offensive )
  • from September 16 - trench warfare

1917

  • until April 20 - trench warfare
  • April 21-25 - Transport to the Western Front in Flanders
  • April 26th to July 24th - trench warfare in the Geluvelt / Zandvoorde area
  • July 25-26 - Transport to the Caudry group, Battle of Cambrai
  • July 28th to August 28th - fighting in front of the Siegfried Line near Vendhuile
  • 0 September 2 to October 4 - rest and training time in Bertry
  • 0 October 5-15 - Autumn Battle in Flanders
  • October 22nd to November 18th - Trench warfare between Meuse and Moselle
  • November 18 to December 3 - Deployment in Italy as a reserve in the Venetian Alps
  • 0 December 5th to 8th - transport to Upper Alsace
  • from December 9th - readiness and training for war of movement

1918

  • February 7th - readiness and training for war of movement
  • 0 February 8-28 - trench warfare in the Queant room
  • 0 March 1 to 14 - training / preparation for the spring offensive
  • March 21 to April 6 - Great Battle of France
  • 0 April 7-25 - Trench warfare in the Bucquoy area
  • April 29th to May 28th - rest and training in the Fechain room
  • May 29 to July 13 - Reserve of the Supreme Army Command
  • July 15-17 - used during the Battle of the Marne
  • July 18-25 - Defensive battles between Soissons and Reims
  • July 26th to August 3rd - defensive battles between Marne and Vesle
  • 0 August 9 to September 2 - training period in the Metz area
  • 0 September 3-14 - trench warfare in Lorraine
  • September 15 to October 4 - fighting in the Woevre plain and west of the Moselle
  • 0 October 5 to 12 - defensive battles in Champagne and on the Meuse
  • October 13th to November 4th - Fights on the Aisne , Aire and Vesle
  • 0 November 5-11 - fighting in the Antwerp-Meuse position
  • from November 11th - evacuation of the occupied territory, march back to the garrison

1919

  • by January 8th - evacuation of the occupied territory, march back to the garrison

Organization and subordination

from to Insinuation
06. August 1914 9. Infantry-Division
07. August 1914 03. September 1914 6th Cavalry Division
03. September 1914 December 25, 1915 33. Infantry-Division
December 25, 1915 July 31, 1916 34th Infantry Division , XVI. Army Corps
05. August 1916 16. September 1916 237. Infantry-Brigade, 119. Infantry-Division [2]
16. September 1916 11. November 1918 Jäger Regiment No. 6, 195th Infantry Division

Commanders

Rank Name Date [3]
Major/Oberstleutnant Ludwig Gans zu Putlitz February 17, 1809 to January 10, 1810
Major Christoph of Crammon January 17, 1810 to February 19, 1812
Major/Oberstleutnant Karl von Streit February 21, 1812 to December 17, 1813
Major Ferdinand von Boltenstern December 18, 1813 to January 3, 1814
Major August von Neumann 0 February 4, 1814 to October 9, 1815
Captain / Major Heinrich von Keller October 10, 1815 to November 22, 1820
Major/Oberstleutnant Gottlieb von Goszicki November 23, 1820 to May 31, 1832
Captain / Major Friedrich von Vollgnad 0 July 1, 1832 to February 20, 1841
Captain / Major Albert of Baczko February 22, 1841 to September 21, 1851
Major Ernst Leo von Holwede October 30, 1850 to July 25, 1856
Major Leonhard von Bornstedt July 26, 1856 to May 21, 1858
Lieutenant colonel Julius von Roeder May 22, 1858 to February 16, 1859
Major/Oberstleutnant Gustav von Fabeck February 17, 1859 to September 19, 1861
Major/Oberstleutnant Gustav von Weller September 20, 1861 to October 29, 1866
Lieutenant colonel Rudolf von Waldersee October 30, 1866 to September 5, 1870
Lieutenant colonel Christian Boedicker 0 September 6, 1870 to November 3, 1871
Major August von der Schulenburg 0 November 4, 1871 to November 19, 1873
Major/Oberstleutnant Karl von Kczewski November 20, 1873 to February 4, 1878
Major/Oberstleutnant Rudolf von Winterfeld 0 February 5, 1878 to July 13, 1883
Major Maximilian du Jarrys from La Roche July 14, 1883 to November 4, 1885
Major/Oberstleutnant Eduard von Müller November 11, 1885 to February 14, 1889
Major/Oberstleutnant Klaus from and to Egloffstein February 16, 1889 to February 16, 1894
Major Ehrenreich von Redern February 17, 1894 to September 15, 1895
Lieutenant colonel Arthur by Ferno September 16, 1895 to June 14, 1896
Lieutenant colonel Richard von Beck June 15, 1896 to October 17, 1902
Lieutenant colonel Ferdinand von Trossel October 18, 1902 to April 23, 1904
Major/Oberstleutnant Arnold von Bauer April 24, 1904 to January 26, 1908
Major/Oberstleutnant Hasso von Wedel January 27, 1908 to April 21, 1912
Lieutenant colonel Maximilian von Stockhausen April 22, 1912 to August 1, 1914
Major Walter von Müllenheim-Rechberg 0 August 1, 1914 to April 8, 1916
Captain Wilhelm von Gazen called Gaza April 14, 1916 to March 17, 1918
Captain Brendel March 18-21, 1918 (Führer)
lieutenant Keil March 21-22, 1918 (Führer)
Captain Glasow March 25 to April 26, 1918 (Führer)
Captain Leopold Wegener April 26, 1918 to January 8, 1919

equipment

The equipment consisted of a black felt shako with a Prussian cockade and a black and white pompom . The hat was hunter green with a red border. The uniform was also a hunter's green, with gold brass buttons and a red border, plus a black scarf, a black belt and a black ammunition box. The battalion was armed with a Potsdam rifle .

literature

  • Carl Friedrich Bumtau: The hunters and riflemen of the Prussian army. Volume 1, p. 221 f.
  • Georg Alt: The Royal Prussian Standing Army. Volume 1, p. 359.
  • von Wolff, von Klaaß, Kaczynski: War history of the Jäger Battalion von Neumann (1st Silesian) No. 5. From Germany's great times. Volume 17, printing and publishing: Bernhard Sporn, Zeulenroda 1930. Digitized version of the Württemberg State Library .

Individual evidence

  1. Düsseldorf was designated as the location in 1849/50. The battalion was involved in the suppression of the Baden Revolution in Baden .
  2. Actually subordinated to 6th Jäger Regiment, 195th Infantry Division. Due to the critical situation on the Eastern Front during the Brusilov Offensive, it was loaned to other units before the Jäger Regiment No. 6 was formed.
  3. ^ Günter Wegmann (ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The staffing of the active infantry regiments, as well as Jäger and MG battalions, military district commands and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , pp. 399-400 .