King Infantry Regiment (6th Lorraine) No. 145 - Königs-Infanterie-Regiment (6. Lothringisches) Nr. 145

King Infantry Regiment (6th Lorraine) No. 145

active July 28, 1890
State Prussia
Armed forces Prussian Army
Branch of service Infantry
Insinuation XVI. Armee-Korps
Former locations Montigny , Fort Württemberg and Frescati Castle
King Infantry Regiment No. 145

The king Infantry Regiment (6th Lorraine) no. 145 was an infantry joined the Prussian army .

story

The regiment's epaulets

The regiment was donated on July 28, 1890 and stationed in Metz . Two battalions were in the infantry barracks in Montigny , one battalion at Fort Württemberg and at Frescati Castle. It was established from the following companies of the infantry regiments: 7./71, 7./72, 8./96, 4./36, 2./69, 5./70, 9./30, 7./29, 5 ./87, 6./80, 6./81 and 9./88.

The association was subordinate to the 68th Infantry Brigade of the 34th Division .

Regarding the foundation, the commemorative publication of the former King Infantry Regiment (6th Lorraine) No. 145 states:

The infantry regiment No. 145 was founded and set up by the highest cabinet order of July 28, 1890 [1] in the course of the army increase on October 1, 1890. On September 4, 1893 [2] His Majesty occasionally a parade on the parade ground Frescati "in recognition of the good attitude of the regiment," said the Emperor and King to his boss , he was awarded the signature "WR II", which is now on the Wore armpit tabs and shoulder pieces instead of the number "145" and gave him the name King Infantry Regiment No. 145. On October 18, 1895 [3] he gave them the black hair bush of the grenadier regiments.

On January 27, 1902, Wilhelm II issued the army order that the associations, which had previously been run without a rural team name, were given an extension of their name in order to better differentiate and develop tradition. From this point on, the regiment was known as the King's Infantry Regiment (6th Lorraine) No. 145.

On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the emperor on June 16, 1913, the emperor awarded the regiment the "flying eagle" (guard eagle without a star [4] ) as a helmet ornament, which until then had been the simple Prussian line eagle (called "cuckoo").

First World War

In the First World War a total of 3,525 soldiers of the regiment died.

Battle calendar

1914
  • August 22-27 - Battle of Longwy, Longuyon and in the L'Othainbach section (Fillières, Mercy-le-Haut, Nouillon-Pont, Spincourt)
  • August 28th to September 1st - Battle of the Meuse crossings (Dannevoux)
  • 0 September 2 to 3 - Battle of Varennes-Montfaucon
  • 0 September 4th to 5th - pursuit west of Verdun and through the Argonne
  • 0 September 6-12 - Battle of Vaubecourt-Fleuty (Bulainville)
  • September 10th to 11th - night attack at Louppy-Heipes (Seraucourt)
  • September 17th to 24th - Battle of Varennes
  • September 25th - Fighting in the Argonne Forest
1915
  • Bagatelle - Pavilion - Madamebach - Charmebach - Jupshöhe - Thümmelhöhe - Stork's Nest - Hildebrandgraben - Staircase Ditch - Pus Bump - Donkey's Nose - Height 285 - Bolante - Vauquoi (III) - St. Juvin - Champigneulle
1916
  • to 18 August - Bagatelle - Pavilion - Madamebach - Charmebach - Jupshöhe - Thümmelhöhe - Stork's Nest - Hildebrandgraben - Staircase Ditch - Boil - Donkey's Nose - Height 285 - Bolante - Vauquoi (III) - St. Juvin - Champigneulle
  • August 23 to September 9 - Battle of Verdun
  • September 10th to 20th - steep slope, Douaumont, Thiaumont, Fleury, M-Raum
  • September 23 to November 2 - Fights in the Argonne Forest (Fille Morte)
  • 0 November 3 to December 2 - Trench warfare in the Vosges
1917
  • 0 January 4th to 13th - Trench warfare in Lorraine (III)
  • January 21-27 - Trench warfare in Lorraine (II)
  • 0 February 6th to March 9th - fighting in the Argonne Forest (Mortier)
  • March 14th to 24th - Trench warfare in Champagne (I)
  • March 25th to April 5th - Trench warfare in Champagne (III)
  • 0 April 6th to May 27th - Aisne-Champagne double battle
  • May 28th to August 8th - Trench warfare near Reims
  • August 10th to 30th - Battle of Flanders (Hooge, Polygon Wald, Nonne Bosschen, Gheluvelt, Herenthage Park)
  • September 13th to October 27th - trench warfare between Meuse and Moselle (especially fighting near Flirey)
  • October 29th to November 2nd - rearguard battles on and south of the Ailette
  • 0 November 3 to 9 - trench warfare north of the Ailette
  • November 10th to 15th - Trench warfare near Reims
  • November 16-20 - Trench warfare in Champagne
  • November 22nd to 29th - Battle of Cambrai
  • November 30th to December 1st - Assault battle near Cambrai (Villers-Guislain)
  • from December 8th - in the area of ​​the 7th Army
1918
  • to January 8 - in the area of ​​the 7th Army
  • 0 January 9 to March 6 - Trench warfare north of the Ailette
  • 0 March 7-20 - resting time behind 18th Army
  • March 21-22 - breakthrough battle at St. Quentin-La-Fère (La Folie-Banay)
  • March 23 to 24 - Fighting in the crossing of the Somme and Crozat Canal between St. Christ and Tergnier
  • March 25th to 31st - Pursuit battles near Montdidier-Noyon
  • 0 April 7th to May 26th - fights on the Avre and Montdidier-Noyon
  • May 27-29 - pursuit between Oise and Aisne and over the Vesle to the Marne
  • May 30th to June 13th - Assault fighting west and south of Soissons
  • June 14th to July 4th - Trench warfare between Oise, Aisne and Marne
  • 0 July 5-17 - trench warfare west of Soissons
  • July 18th to 25th - Defense battle between Soissons and Reims (Paris mountain)
  • July 26-29 - Mobile defensive battle between Marne and Vesle
  • July 30th to August 9th - resting time behind the 9th Army
  • August 18 to September 4 - Defensive battle between Oise and Aisne
  • 0 September 5 to 18 - fighting in front of the Siegfried position
  • September 19-26 - Fighting in the Siegfried position
  • September 27th to October 9th - defensive battle between Cambrai and St. Quentin (on October 8th, 1918 almost the whole regiment was destroyed)
  • October 10 to November 4 - fights in front of and in the Hermann position (Petit Verly)
  • 0 November 5th to 11th - fighting off Antwerp up to the Meuse position
  • from November 12th - evacuation of the occupied territory and march back home

Whereabouts

After the war took place from 24 December 1918 in Barby , the demobilization of the regiment. It was officially dissolved on April 15, 1919.

At the end of December 1918, the establishment of a volunteer company was started in parts, which then joined the 9th Division of the 3rd Landesschützen Brigade ( Detachement "Gerstenberg") of the Landesschützenkorps operating as a Freikorps . In June 1919 it was taken over as the 2nd Battalion of the 8th Reichswehr Rifle Regiment.

Other parts went to the volunteer battalion "Eschmann", which transferred to the volunteer department "Thümmel" on March 1, 1919. This was dissolved at the end of April 1919 and on May 1, 1919 the III. Battalion of the Reichswehr Rifle Regiment 49. [5]

The tradition continued in the Reichswehr with the 13th Company of the 12th Infantry Regiment .

Commanders

Rank Name Date [6]
Oberst Louis von Freyhold September 20, 1890 to September 18, 1891
Oberst Wilhelm Katz September 19, 1891 to May 19, 1893
Oberst Moritz from and to Gilsa May 20, 1893 to March 21, 1897
Oberst Max von Pawlowski March 22, 1897 to May 21, 1900
Lieutenant colonel Friedrich von Arnoldi May 22 to August 17, 1900 (in charge of the tour)
Oberst Friedrich von Arnoldi August 18, 1900 to March 9, 1904
Oberst Bogistav from Schwerin March 10, 1904 to April 1, 1908
Oberst Max of victory 0 April 2, 1908 to June 30, 1911
Oberst Hermann von der Heyde 0 July 1, 1911 to April 3, 1914
Oberst Kurt von Wahlen-Jürgass 0 April 4, 1914 to October 7, 1915
Lieutenant colonel Friedrich Franz von Huth 0 October 8, 1915 to January 1919
Oberst Willy of Livonius January 31 to April 15, 1919

On August 4, 1918, Wilhelm II introduced the former commanding general Bruno von Mudra in recognition of his excellent service à la suite of the regiment, which gave rise to the following telegram to the regiment: By the grace of Sr. Majesty, I am with yesterday la suite of the KIR. It is a particular pleasure for me to enter into a lasting relationship with the brave regiment to which I have on so many occasions, where I have the XVI. AK. could lead against the enemy. So continue forward and on in the old spirit until our enemy is on the ground. v. Mudra .

Literary afterlife

Adrienne Thomas lets the regiment, represented by Lieutenant Olbrich, revive in her novel “Die Katrin wird Soldat” (1930).

literature

  • History of the King Infantry Regiment No. 145 (from 1890 to 1900). Metz 1900, P. Müller's publishing bookshop.
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Isenburg: The King's Infantry Regiment (6th Lothring.) No. 145 in the Great War 1914-1918. Klasing & Co. Berlin 1922/23.
  1. From mobilization to evacuation to the Battle of Cambrai (November 21, 1917).
  2. From the arrival in the territory of the 2nd Army (November 22, 1917) to demobilization and dissolution.
  • Rudolf Krüll: Honor list of the comrades of the King Inf.-Rgt who remained in the field of honor. No. 145. Publishing house of the Kyffhäuserbund. Düsseldorf 1939.

Weblinks

Individual evidence

  1. War Ministry (Ed.): Army Ordinance Sheet. No. 18 of August 2, 1890. Mittler & Sohn. Berlin 1890. p. 154.
  2. War Ministry (Ed.): Army Ordinance Sheet. No. 25 of October 13, 1893. Mittler & Sohn. Berlin 1893. p. 260.
  3. War Ministry (Ed.): Army Ordinance Sheet. No. 30 of November 6, 1895. Mittler & Sohn. Berlin 1895. p. 247.
  4. War Ministry (Ed.): Army Ordinance Sheet. Special issue for the 25th anniversary of the government from June 16, 1913, awarding of awards to units. Mittler & Sohn. Berlin 1913
  5. ^ Jürgen Kraus: Handbook of the units and troops of the German army 1914-1918. Part VI: Infantry. Volume 1: Infantry Regiments. Publishing house Militaria. Vienna 2007. ISBN 978-3-902526-14-4 , p. 229.
  6. Günter Wegmann (Ed.), Günter Wegner: Formation history and staffing of the German armed forces 1815-1990. Part 1: Occupation of the German armies 1815–1939. Volume 2: The occupation of the active infantry regiments as well as Jäger and MG battalions, military district commandos and training managers from the foundation or list until 1939. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1992, ISBN 3-7648-1782-8 , p. 362.