Schloss Müggenburg - Schloss Müggenburg

Manor house of Müggenburg Castle, view from the east

The Müggenburg Castle , also house Müggenburg and soon even the Müggenburg called, is a moated castle in the Neuss district Norf . It was built on behalf of the Düsseldorf court councilor Carl Dominicus von Schwartz towards the middle of the 18th century, but was based on a medieval predecessor. The complex's buildings initially served as a noble women's monastery , for which Schwartz also had a chapel built. Today it is used as the Roman Catholic parish church of Norf.

Since the end of the 19th century Müggenburg Castle has been privately owned by the von Waldthausen family , who still use it as their residence today. Visiting the buildings is not possible.

story

Little is known of the beginnings of the castle. It was first mentioned in the early 13th century. [1] In older publications you can often read that the complex owes its name to the knights of Müggenhausen (also Muggenhausen), whose seat it is supposed to have been, but a connection with this aristocratic family proven in the Eifel in the 13th century is questionable. [2] In the 16th century, the Müggenburg house belonged to the Barons of Quadt . Arnold von Quadt has been handed down as the owner for the year 1518. [2] In 1669 the Counts of Kessel appear as sitters. [3]

Müggenburg mansion towards the end of the 19th century

Mid-18th century was the Palatine Councilor Karl Dominicus Schwartz owners. Around 1750 he gave the order to build today's manor house . For this purpose, the old buildings of the previous complex, about whose appearance nothing is known, were laid down. [4] Although the new building did not take place until around 20 years after the death of Gabriel Grupello , he is said to have supplied the designs for it. [5] Together with his wife Maria Agnes, née Baroness von Hettermann, Schwartz founded the free world monastery "de la Congregation de Notre Dame" for noble ladies on Müggenburg and had a chapel built on the castle grounds. [6]The monastery existed until secularization , after which the property became the property of the von und zum Pütz family. However, the collegiate chapel was no longer owned. It has been functioning - after several extensions - since 1820 [2] as the parish church of Norf.

In 1834 [2] Baron Arnold von and zum Pütz bequeathed Müggenhausen Castle to the poor fund of the city of Cologne. This sold in 1838 [7] to the Düsseldorf pharmacist Karl Kahler, whose family owned the plant until the end of the 19th century. Then it was acquired by Karl Honsberg, whose daughter married the Kommerzienrat von Waldhausen and thus brought the palace to this family. Von Waldhausen also acquired the neighboring Vellbrüggen estate in 1913 . [8] The property still belongs to his family today, who still live in the manor house. [9]

description

Castle Müggenburg is about 350 meters west of the center of Norf and is a two-part system consisting of a mansion from the middle of the 18th century, a northeast thereof lying Vorburg . Both are surrounded by a shared moat , which is widened like a pond around the manor house. It is fed by the Norfbach.

Gate construction on the east side

The mansion is a rectangular brick building, the two floors of which are closed off by a pan-roofed hipped roof. It stands on a high substructure that rises directly from the water of the castle pond. At its two northern corners, massive, square towers with a slate-covered mansard roof protrude from the wall. Together with the rectangular building, they frame a small courtyard which can be reached via a stone bridge. From there, a double flight leads staircase with elaborately forged Rococo - ornaments [1] up to the main entrance on the mezzanine floor on the north side. The entrance withThe skylight and roof is the only opening in the house on this side that is framed from light stone . It is located in a three-storey central risalit with pilasters at the corners and a triangular gable with an ox-eye in the gable field . On the south side of the manor house, too, the central axis is emphasized by a central projection. A long bridge leads to it from the landscaped castle park , which probably did not exist in the Middle Ages. [10]

The former outer bailey of the complex from the 19th century [11] is a three-winged courtyard in the shape of a horseshoe, which is open on the south side facing the manor house. Access to the outer bailey is from the east through a free-standing brick gate , which has a slate-covered mansard roof with a crowning weather vane .

literature

Weblinks

Commons : Müggenburg, Neuss-Norf - Collection of images, videos and audio files

Individual evidence

  1. a b Bernhard Gondorf, Werner Otto: Burgen und Schlösser. Highlights of Lower Rhine architecture. Mercator, Duisburg 1991, ISBN 3-87463-172-9 , p. 77.
  2. a b c d Entry by Karin Striewe on Müggenburg Castle in the scientific database " EBIDAT " of the European Castle Institute, accessed on October 9, 2020.
  3. ^ Friedrich Everhard von Mering: History of the castles, manors, abbeys and monasteries in the Rhineland and the provinces of Jülich, Cleve, Berg and Westphalen. Volume 7, 1844, p. 116.
  4. ^ Brigitte Janssen, Walter Janssen: Castles, palaces and court festivals in the Neuss district. 1980, p. 217.
  5. ^ Karl Emerich Krämer: Castles in and around Düsseldorf. 1980, p. 66.
  6. ^ Friedrich Everhard von Mering: History of the castles, manors, abbeys and monasteries in the Rhineland and the provinces of Jülich, Cleve, Berg and Westphalen. Volume 7, 1844, p. 117.
  7. ^ Friedrich Everhard von Mering: History of the castles, manors, abbeys and monasteries in the Rhineland and the provinces of Jülich, Cleve, Berg and Westphalen. Volume 7, 1844, p. 119.
  8. ^ Jens Wroblewski, André Wemmers: Theiss-Burgenführer Niederrhein . Konrad Theiss , Stuttgart 2001, ISBN 3-8062-1612-6 , pp. 136.
  9. Information on Müggenburg Castle on the website of the Forum Archive and History Neuss e. V. , accessed October 10.
  10. ^ Brigitte Janssen, Walter Janssen: Castles, palaces and court festivals in the Neuss district. 1980, p. 216.
  11. ^ Georg Dehio: Handbook of German Art Monuments. North Rhine-Westphalia. Volume 1, 1967, p. 517.

Coordinates: 51 ° 9 '20.2 " N , 6 ° 43' 17.2" E